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A. Spruce
Re: Water-damaged exterior wall

The only way to replace the plywood sheathing is to do it from the outside. The exterior wall covering will need to be removed sufficiently to access the entire area of damage, plus space to work, meaning the damage may only be an inch past the stud, but you will need to go to the next stud for proper support of the repair, as well as the structural integrity it will provide.

The access is what it is, you have to deal with it. If it's a bush, dig the bush out or tie it back out of the way, when you're done with the repair you can put the bush back in its place. If it's an AC condenser, then you're a bit screwed and will have to do your best to work around it. Like I said, access is what it is, you just deal with it in the best way possible.

You say that the damage is on the corner of the house. you will need to open the wall on the exterior to fully inspect the studs for damage. You will want to fully inspect the underside of the subfloor.

Replacement of the sill plate is fairly straight forward, you cut the section out and replace it with like material. Wood on wood will be standard lumber, wood on concrete will be pressure treated. You can cut the plate in the middle of a stud bay where it is good and once the new piece is in place, toenail the end into the existing plate as well as place a piece of 2x over the top of the splice that stretches from stud to stud and nail that into place well.

Specifics of opening up the exterior will be dependent upon the type of wall covering we're talking about.

dj1
Re: Water-damaged exterior wall

Phoenix,

Spruce briefly told what has to be done, but one has to have practical knowledge how to actually do a project like this, and now is not the time for you to learn. The thing here is, that you're cutting the exterior, and you have to know how to close it once the repair is done.

I know that money is tight, and you want to save as much as possible by DIY. But as we always say "the cheap comes out more expensive" at the end. Get a framer to do it. A framer who can finish the job, siding and all, with no leaks.

This is what home ownership is all about.

dj1
Re: Water-damaged exterior wall

One more important detail which Spruce has left out: A replacement piece of sill plate on concrete needs to be anchored into the concrete (depending on the length, at least 2 - Hilti redheads or equivalent will do).

phoenix87ta
Re: Water-damaged exterior wall

A. Spruce, actually, what I was saying was that the sheathing on that wall is only partially accessible from the outside by removing the siding. Looking at it, it seems that some of the lower section backs up to my living room wall. *Sigh* so in order to get at it, I'll presumably have to open up that wall as well. Also, thanks for the tips on the sill plate. That seems easy enough to deal with.

A. Spruce
Re: Water-damaged exterior wall
phoenix87ta wrote:

A. Spruce, actually, what I was saying was that the sheathing on that wall is only partially accessible from the outside by removing the siding. Looking at it, it seems that some of the lower section backs up to my living room wall. *Sigh* so in order to get at it, I'll presumably have to open up that wall as well. Also, thanks for the tips on the sill plate. That seems easy enough to deal with.

I would need more pictures to see what you're describing. If there is a wall perpendicular to the damage (right side of photo? ), then the sheathing will end there. It will probably start back up again once around the corner, but who knows if there is damage until you open things up and see it first hand.

From the image, I don't think this is an issue, but DJ is right about attaching the sill to concrete. He is also correct that this job is a tad more complex than the skills of the typical DIY'r. I'm not saying that you can't do it, just advising to know when to say when and bring in a pro if the need arises.

phoenix87ta
Re: Water-damaged exterior wall

I'll snag you some more pictures tomorrow, but in short, this is the wall between an upper floor and a lower floor in a split level. The upper section of the wall should be accessible by simply removing the siding, but the lower section is wedged between the two levels of the house.

And no, that section of sill plate won't be attached to concrete, so no worries there.

I'm also shopping for contractors already, but anything I can do without the contractor's assistance is money I don't have to pay in labor, so I'll see where the job goes.

phoenix87ta
Re: Water-damaged exterior wall

More pictures taken. I've outlined approximately where the wall in question falls. It looks as though a good chunk of that wall literally isn't accessible from the outside, and I'll probably have to open up the drywall on the opposite side of the interior wall, but let me know if I'm completely off-base on that.

imgur.com/a/OxD3l

A. Spruce
Re: Water-damaged exterior wall

What is attic access like to that wall?

The plywood may stop at the roof line, it may drop below, it's hard to say, my suspicion is that it does. If not, then your job just got a whole lot more difficult.

Pay extremely close attention to how that wall is flashed to the roof line so that when you put it back together you can do it properly. Take pics if necessary.

phoenix87ta
Re: Water-damaged exterior wall

The plywood definitely extends below the roof line. Why, I don't know :(

In any event, attic access can be made to happen. There's no hatch on the lower floor to get in there, but there may be one from the garage. If there isn't, one can be made.

And I'm pretty sure it extends below the attic as well, although I'm not yet 100% sure on that. That's why I was considering the need to open up the living room wall.

phoenix87ta
Re: Water-damaged exterior wall

Come to think of it, is there any real reason to replace sheathing that's inside the house, or should I only be concerned with the sheathing on areas that back up to the siding?

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