12 posts / 0 new
Last post
johnL
water in AC drain pan

Our basement typically stays 8-10 degrees cooler than the main floor. So when it's hot enough outside that we need some cooling, it's tempting to turn the AC fan to ON and let some of that cool basement air cool the rest of the house. (The basement is partly finished and has air supplies and a return, just like the main floor.) The problem is, if we do that then the air moving over the drain pan picks up the water that's sitting in the pan, raising the humidity in the house. (I had thought it was doing that, just from the way it felt, and then I recently read an article that said that's exactly what happens.) We definitely do not want to raise the humidity; we're already using a dehumidifier to keep it down.

My questions: It looks like the primary drain is more than an inch above the bottom of the drain pan. Why in the world is it so high? That just holds water in there. Is there any reason why I can't put another hole in the drain pan, right at the bottom of the side, to drain most of the water out?

Thanks a lot.

Sten
Re: water in AC drain pan

Well, maybe it's plugged up, does it drain at all??

HoustonRemodeler
Re: water in AC drain pan

Has it been cleaned out recently?

johnL
Re: water in AC drain pan

Sure, it drains fine. The problem is that the drain is about an inch above the bottom of the pan, so there has to be a lot of water in it before it even reaches the level of the drain opening so it can go out.
Seems to me the drain opening should be even with the bottom of the pan so that water doesn't even have a chance to collect.

dj1
Re: water in AC drain pan

I know what you're talking about.

It's a poor design of the pan, in my opinion.

However, trying to cut a lower opening for the drain may result in leaks.

A better remedy would be to tilt the pan slightly, so that the water would drain faster through the existing outlet.

johnL
Re: water in AC drain pan
dj1 wrote:

A better remedy would be to tilt the pan slightly, so that the water would drain faster through the existing outlet.

Maybe I'm not using the correct terminology. This pan with the drains is above the blower/furnace and below the coils. I can't tilt the pan because the coils are on top of it (Maybe they're part of it?) and the whole thing is connected to the furnace.

Sten
Re: water in AC drain pan

You have an add on or what they call a cut in which is when the furnace is used to move the cool air instead of an air handler. I doubt that the drain hole is 1 inch above the bottom of the pan but you never know. At any rate all you can do is have the pan replaced, I'm sure an HVAC Co. can find a generic pan that has the drain hole closer to the bottom of the pan, in all reality it should be almost flush. If your mechanically inclined you may be able to do it yourself but beware of kinking the refrigerant lines, that job can be a pain in the butt. Good luck

dj1
Re: water in AC drain pan

If we are talking about the same thing...The drain hole can't be 100% flash to the bottom of the pan when it's on the side wall of the pan.

The reason: it has to have some little space for a washer and a retaining nut to hold the 3/4" male adaptor in place. Even if the hole would have been at the bottom of the pan, the top of the adapror would rise above the bottom of the pan.

To continue Stan's suggestion, maybe an a/c guy knows of a pan where the hole is lower than the one you have.

johnL
Re: water in AC drain pan

Okay, thanks guys.

Sten
Re: water in AC drain pan

You don't use a washer or retaining nut to hold a 3/4 male adapter, it's a pipe thread.

dj1
Re: water in AC drain pan

Sten,
We obviously are not talking about the same thing.

The pan under certain units (like attic units) have a catch pan under the units, with a PVC male adaptor with a washer and a nut. this pipe leads to the outside.

Pages

Sponsored Stories

TV Listings

Find TV listings for This Old House and Ask This Old House in your area.