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Todd
Wainscoting Question

I want to install some wainscoting over drywall. Is it required that I put up a plywood (or even mdf) backing like they show at http://www.thisoldhouse.com/toh/how-to/step/0,,20537962_21069073,00.html? Or can I simply install it right over the drywall?

Thanks!

JLMCDANIEL
Re: Wainscoting Question

What they are showing is using plywood as part of the wainscoting, if you are actually installing wainscoting you do not need to add a backer.

Jack

A. Spruce
Re: Wainscoting Question

Jack is right, in that link they are using plywood as the wainscot. Wainscot does not require a backer, you simply glue it directly to the wall, with a few nails here and there to hold it in place while the glue dries. Same holds true if you were using boards instead of plywood, glue it directly to the wall with a few nails to hold the pieces in place while the glue dries.

Todd
Re: Wainscoting Question

So once painted I won't notice a difference between the texture of the drywall (it's smooth and not textured) and the boards?

Thanks everyone!

A. Spruce
Re: Wainscoting Question

I don't understand the question. You are going to notice that there is wainscot, regardless of the style of wainscot you install. What does wall texture have to do with the wainscot?

Mastercarpentry
Re: Wainscoting Question

The link seems to show smooth wood paneling and what the others who have replied here seem to be thinking of is the more traditional bead-board style wainscoting. Of course none will be as smooth as sheetrock; that's the whole point of wainscoting. And yes, if the sheetrock underneath is sound you can install right over it.

Phil

Jeanne
Re: Wainscoting Question

In a true batten board or picture frame type wainscot, a board does go on the wall first as in the link. I am not sure if this was due to the type of texture on the older plaster walls, but the board gave a nice smooth surface. With today's drywall - if it isn't smooth already, the texture can usually be sanded down if it is truly noticeable, so most are skipping the board and putting the battens or picture frames right on the wall using adhesive and some nails. Nails alone won't work because often there is no stud under the batten if doing batten board. The chair rail or other millwork used for the top is nailed into the studs as is the baseboard. There are many DIY tutorials for batten board or picture frame wainscot.

A. Spruce
Re: Wainscoting Question

You know, I've been in this biz for over 30 years and I've never seen a wall that was textured so heavily that wainscot, of any type, didn't cover it just fine, so it confuses me, quite significantly, as to what the concern is about it. Plywood, as in the video, will cover anything, individual T&G boards will cover anything, so I fail to see where the issue lies.

Jeanne
Re: Wainscoting Question

People these days are skipping the plywood and affixing battens or picture frames right to the drywall. The link was not about beadboard wainscot. I don't think there is an issue accept the op probably wants to skip the plywood and affix right to the wall - which is fine. Maybe the plywood was used in the past before there were adhesives to give a nailing surface for the battens or other moldings, and is still used when the wall has too much texture to get the batten board look without it.

I have been in expensive homes that just attach the moulding right to the drywall - with no plywood to make the wainscot. On most, you can tell because there is still the very light drywall texture - no big deal it looks good - but I had a person on another site say that application was "faux" batten board because they didn't use the board, just put the battens on the walls - so I guess there are some purist out there who think it should be done like in the link to be true wainscot.

dj1
Re: Wainscoting Question
fossilnews wrote:

So once painted I won't notice a difference between the texture of the drywall (it's smooth and not textured) and the boards?

Thanks everyone!

The use of plywood is for supporting what ever wood goes on. You don't want to use plywood? make sure all pieces are safely attached to the drywall.

Worried about the drywall finish? it can be easily matched to the other parts of the house.

A. Spruce
Re: Wainscoting Question
Lily wrote:

I have been in expensive homes that just attach the moulding right to the drywall - with no plywood to make the wainscot. On most, you can tell because there is still the very light drywall texture - no big deal it looks good - but I had a person on another site say that application was "faux" batten board because they didn't use the board, just put the battens on the walls - so I guess there are some purist out there who think it should be done like in the link to be true wainscot.

This was not clear in the OPs question, and they have not returned to clarify anything. What you say makes sense, though, IMHO, it's not wainscot if there is no paneling used, a chair rail, yes, wainscot, no.

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