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SophieC
Re: Wainscot molding transition

The link didn't work for me, so I'm not sure what the picture looks like, but I do comprehend the explanation. However, with that being said, I'm still not understanding the explanation of the 45 deg. corner and how it would look. Sorry about that. I am a very visual person and sometimes I just don't get an explanation. I tried looking up what you described on youtube, but had no luck.

Thanks for the explanation about the support for the saw.....that I understand.

A. Spruce
Re: Wainscot molding transition

This site seriously SUCKS after the software update . . .:mad:

Here's the link again, maybe this one will work, if not, all it is is an image of a 90* return.
http://www.garymkatz.com/TrimTechniques/StoolApron/Stool-Apron-stool.jpg

What I'm saying is that you are not restricted to a 90* return, you can go at any angle that suits your needs. Returning at a 45* angle will show more of the scab piece. Look at it this way, pour a pile of flour on the counter, then level off the top so it is flat. Where the top and side of the pile meets is roughly 45*. Now, imagine that the countertop is the wall the flat top of the pile of flour is the face of the apron, and the sloped side will be the return. Does that help?

SophieC
Re: Wainscot molding transition

Your link worked this time. :)

I think that I understand what it would look like, but not completely certain. I'd have to see a photo of it to decide if it is something I wanted.

A. Spruce
Re: Wainscot molding transition

The only reason to change the angle of the return is if you want the apron to meet the end of the shelf. If you butt it into the door/window trim, then all I would recommend doing is chamfering the end of the apron as Jack suggested to be the same thickness as the door/window trim, if thickness is an issue. If the door/window trim is thicker, then just butt the apron into it.

SophieC
Re: Wainscot molding transition

SPRUCE!!!!!! I think I've got it! And if I do, I feel like an idiot!:o

I was lying in bed last night trying to fall asleep and this topic was on my mind. Suddenly, I had a euraka moment. In the photo you provided a link to, it shows a 90 deg. return on the bullnose stool. It has 2 pieces cut at 45 deg. that when mated, make the 90 deg. All this time, I was thinking with the 45 deg. return you were suggesting, that I was still going to have 2 pieces. But, I think what you mean is that the apron below my shelf, instead of having a square cut end as shown in your photo link, will have a taper back towards the wall at 45 deg. Am I understanding you now?!

A. Spruce
Re: Wainscot molding transition

I think you're close.

With a 45* return, you're still going to have two pieces, the main piece under the length of the shelf, then the scab at the end that returns to the wall. The difference is that instead of cutting two 45* miters to make a 90* return, you would do two 22.5* miters and the scab would slope back to the wall. Think of it this way, think of it as a ramp rather than a step.

As I said earlier, this is only necessary if you want the apron to extend to the end of the shelf without butting into door/window trim. If you're going to but into door/window trim, then you will simple back bevel the face of your apron to match the thickness of the door/window trim if they are of a thinner material.

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