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SophieC
Wainscot molding transition

Hi guys......

Back with another question! :o

I will be putting up a beadboard wainscot in my bathroom. Where the upper & lower materials on the wall meet, I will not have your typical molding. I will be using at least 3 different pieces to build a small (3" deep) shelf around the room. My question is what advice do you all have for making the transition where this meets up with window casing, door casing, and medicine cabinet?

Thanks,
Sophie

PS.....I love photos if you have any examples to share! :)

A. Spruce
Re: Wainscot molding transition

What three pieces of molding are you using? If it's just a 1x3 with basic apron, simply square cut and hold the trim back from the windows/med cabinet a little bit. If you're using a crown molding under the shelf, then hold them back from the obstacles a bit and return them to the wall.

Google "window apron" and you'll see examples of both methods, obviously, you're doing a shelf and not window apron, but the same still applies to what you're doing.:cool:

JLMCDANIEL
Re: Wainscot molding transition

If it were me, I would take the time to cut and install a return at the windows and medicine cabinet.

Jack

MLB Construction
Re: Wainscot molding transition

i agree with JLM

SophieC
Re: Wainscot molding transition

I'm not 100% sure which 3 pieces I'm using, but I'm almost certain that crown molding will not be used. This is the most likely scenario......

First on the wall will be a 3 1/4" tall baseboard flipped upside down. On top of that, flush with the top of the baseboard will be some sort of case molding to be determined later. Sitting on top of those 2 pieces will be the 1" thick shelf that will have a bullnose front edge. This weekend, I plan to pick up some sample pieces and put them together to see what look I prefer.

Knowing that I am not using crown, is a return still possible?! Whatever I do, it has to go all the way to any door & window trim in order to hide the meeting of the 2 different wall materials.

JLMCDANIEL
Re: Wainscot molding transition

Yes, you can use a return.

Jack

A. Spruce
Re: Wainscot molding transition

Yes, you can still use a return, but instead of returning 90* back to the wall, you will use an angled return so that it meets up with the door trim as requested. When cutting tiny little scabs like this, cut the pieces off much longer sections of trim so that you can safely and securely hang onto the pieces. Install a backboard on your chop saw to give you a solid support. A helper with a second long piece of scrap can hold the scab being cut off so that it doesn't catch in the blade and get broken or flung into oblivion.

Make sure that when you install your shelf piece that it is not going to inhibit door operation. Last thing you want to do is get it all installed, then not be able to open the door fully. Same goes when butting into medicine cabinets, etc.

JLMCDANIEL
Re: Wainscot molding transition

Another solution with the 3" shelf is a gentle taper, bull nosed, reducing its width to mach the depth of the door casing.

Jack

Sombreuil_mongrel
Re: Wainscot molding transition

Often the wainscot cap or nosing overlaps the casing somewhat to facilitate the return. This is chair rail in an 1818 house (OK, sticklers: it got new window casing around 1895, but the chair rail profile is 1818)

Hopefully your casing is heavy enough to compete with the larger wainscot cap, visually and physically.
Casey

SophieC
Re: Wainscot molding transition
A. Spruce wrote:

Yes, you can still use a return, but instead of returning 90* back to the wall, you will use an angled return so that it meets up with the door trim as requested. When cutting tiny little scabs like this, cut the pieces off much longer sections of trim so that you can safely and securely hang onto the pieces. Install a backboard on your chop saw to give you a solid support. A helper with a second long piece of scrap can hold the scab being cut off so that it doesn't catch in the blade and get broken or flung into oblivion.

Make sure that when you install your shelf piece that it is not going to inhibit door operation. Last thing you want to do is get it all installed, then not be able to open the door fully. Same goes when butting into medicine cabinets, etc.

Spruce....I watched a pretty informative video on youtube about how to do a return. The one I watched happened to be on baseboards, but I get the idea. It looks simple enough. However, I'm not sure I understand what you mean by "instead of returning 90* back to the wall, you will use an angled return so that it meets up with the door trim as requested." I'm also not sure I understand what you mentioned about installing a backboard on my saw for support.

I took the two 5-panel solid doors in the bathroom off their hinges and converted them to pocket doors, so no worries about this molding interfering with the door swing. :)

JLMCDANIEL wrote:

Another solution with the 3" shelf is a gentle taper, bull nosed, reducing its width to mach the depth of the door casing.

Jack

Jack, that is most likely what I will end up doing with the shelf. Instead of a straight line angled taper, I will probably make it curved. It will be in line with one end of my kitchen countertop.

Sombreuil_mongrel wrote:

Often the wainscot cap or nosing overlaps the casing somewhat to facilitate the return. This is chair rail in an 1818 house (OK, sticklers: it got new window casing around 1895, but the chair rail profile is 1818)

Hopefully your casing is heavy enough to compete with the larger wainscot cap, visually and physically.
Casey

Casey, I've seen this method before. While I like it, I tend to think in terms of "down the road". If I should ever, in the future, have to take my window or door trim pieces down for ANY reason, I don't want to have to start removing other things to get to it. Thanks for the suggestion though!:)

A. Spruce
Re: Wainscot molding transition
SophieC wrote:

I'm not sure I understand what you mean by "instead of returning 90* back to the wall, you will use an angled return so that it meets up with the door trim as requested.".

This image shows window stool returned at 90*. The end of each piece is cut at 45* and when mated and installed, this is what you get.
http://www.garymkatz.com/TrimTechniques/StoolApron/Stool-Apron-stool.jpg

Say you want the apron to be flush with the tip of the nosing, but don't want the profile thickness of the trim, you would do the same as you did above, but instead of a 90* corner you would make a 45* corner and the tip of the apron molding would have a mating angle cut to lay flat against the wall.

SophieC wrote:

I'm also not sure I understand what you mentioned about installing a backboard on my saw for support.

I am assuming that you are using a power miter saw, or chopsaw as they are more commonly known. You will notice that the back fence has a large gap for the saw to swing through for it's various angles of cut. This large gap makes for a frustrating and dangerous situation when cutting small scabs of trim. By installing a flat board against the fence, you will have a solid surface to fully support the scab being cut. Simply set the saw angle, make your cut through the backboard, then line up your trim to be cut. Here's a little tip, if you have multiple scabs to cut, make ALL your right hand cuts first, reset your backboard, then make all your left hand cuts. You'll understand what I mean when you get into this, as when you change the saw angle you will cut a larger hole into your backboard, defeating it's purpose.

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