65 posts / 0 new
Last post
EE98
Re: voltage in cable coaxial
JLMCDANIEL wrote:

If you have old outlets that are not keyed, that is both slots are the same size, you might try unplugging your TV, turn the plug over and plug it back in. And no an ungrounded GCFI outlet will not work.
Jack

For a fact, the only code approved way to replace a two wire ungrounded outlet with a three wire grounded outlet is to use a GFCI receptacle with a jumper between the neutral and the ground terminals on the device. In doing this, you have to affix a sticker which clearly states "This Is Not A Grounded Outlet," or words to that effect. This allows the use of three wire cords, and the GFCI will trip if the neutral is broken, but it does not magically provide a ground. While neutral and ground are essentially the same electrical point, they are two different ---but related--- things.

This will not, however, fix the voltage on coax shield problem. That's a whole 'nother smoke.

Fencepost
Re: voltage in cable coaxial
EE98 wrote:

For a fact, the only code approved way to replace a two wire ungrounded outlet with a three wire grounded outlet is to use a GFCI receptacle with a jumper between the neutral and the ground terminals on the device. In doing this, you have to affix a sticker which clearly states "This Is Not A Grounded Outlet," or words to that effect. This allows the use of three wire cords, and the GFCI will trip if the neutral is broken, but it does not magically provide a ground. While neutral and ground are essentially the same electrical point, they are two different ---but related--- things.

This will not, however, fix the voltage on coax shield problem. That's a whole 'nother smoke.

Absolutely not correct. Jumpering the neutral and ground is called a "bootleg ground" and is NOT PERMITTED. Installing a GFI is an acceptable way of protecting an ungrounded circuit, and it and all downstream receptacles must be labeled as being ungrounded.

If you jumper the ground and the neutral becomes broken upstream of the GFI, the ground will become live. "Grounded" appliances will have their chassis electrified which becomes a shock hazard. The GFI cannot protect against this shock hazard.

Besides, you resurrected a thread that's over five years old with information that's irrelevant to the original post. That's classic behaviour of a spammer.

EE98
Re: voltage in cable coaxial

Print my post and your comment, and contact your local electrical inspector.

Fencepost
Re: voltage in cable coaxial

Article [250.24 (A)(5)] of the National Electrical Code reads thusly:

"Neutral-to-Ground Connections. A neutral-to-ground connection shall not be made on the load side of the service disconnecting means except as permitted for separately derived systems [250.30(A)(1)], separate buildings or structures [250.32(B)(2)], or meter enclosures [250.142(B) Ex. 2]."

Connecting the ground and neutral at a receptacle on a branch circuit (including GFI receptacles) is a violation of this code requirement. Ask your inspector how it isn't.

Pages

TV Listings

Find TV listings for This Old House and Ask This Old House in your area.