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wdave
Visqueen in crawl space replacement

I have a ranch house in lower michigan (A2) thats on a crawl space and it has 4 outside vents in it. the visqueen that was put down in 1976 is all ripped up and i would like to just put new over the top of the current stuff or do i nee to remove whats already down before i can put new down?
the exterior walls have a little foam on them but nothing on the floor (insulation).
In the summer its very damp in the crawl space.

Re: Visqueen in crawl space replacement

Hello wdave

Since you will have to replace the visqueen, I'd strongly suggest that you take the extra step to fully protect your crawl space from moisture problem, and fully encapsulate and condition it.
It is highly recommendable in regions where the summer is humid.

Encapsulating a crawl space mean sealing all the vents, and lining the whole space with a sturdy 20mil poly vapor barrier, completely isolating the crawl space from the ground and the outside air, sealing all the seams.

Then, add a drain or a sump pump and a conditioning system or a crawl space dehumidifier.

This procedure will protect your floor joists, all the wooden structures, the insulation and keep the crawl space clean, dry and mold free, suitable to be used for storage if you wish.

In addition, the savings in utility bills alone since dry air costs much less to cool and heat, will pay for the encapsulation over time.

Be careful and consult a professional crawl space repair company if you have combustion appliances running in the crawl space. You do not want to create hazardous conditions by depressurizing the crawl space with such utilities in.

Here's a couple of websites with a lot of info on conditioned crawl spaces and its benefits, based on studies conducted by Advanced Energy and Habitat for Humanity.

http://www.crawlspaces.org

http://www.dirt-crawl-spaces.com

Re: Visqueen in crawl space replacement

I agree with CyFree. I actually wrote an article on crawl space science that discusses issues with traditional systems versus closed, conditioned systems. There are a lot of advantages to closing and conditioning your crawl space, if it is done correctly. If something is utilized the wrong way, if an element of care isn't given to a control mechanism, or if something isn't installed adequately, any remedial activity performed in your crawl space may be in vain. It is best to seek professional assistance. Always look for a specialist with the proper insurance; one that can explain the details of their system in a way you can understand; one with a warranty; third-party accreditation/certification is preferred; and someone whose system addresses all elements of thermal, humidity, conditioning and moisture control.

Re: Visqueen in crawl space replacement

I guess I could have shared where my article is for anyone interested in reading it: http://www.solutionsiec.com/crawl_space_science.html

Best wishes to all.

wdave
Re: Visqueen in crawl space replacement

Thanks for the help, but still dont know if i can just put down new over the existing or not.
Doesnt sound like it would be as good as pulling up the old and laying new.

canuk
Re: Visqueen in crawl space replacement

Personally I don't see a problem with applying the new layer over top of the old making sure to get as continious a coverage as possible.

Blue RidgeParkway
Re: Visqueen in crawl space replacement

If you're not going to remediate the dampness problem then no. You don't just put down another layer of plastic, you'll just create a mold slime pool liner.

There have been several good posts already on suggested measures to remediate your damp crawlspace.

There is no JUST about it.

good resource: buildingscience.com

canuk
Re: Visqueen in crawl space replacement
wdave wrote:

I have a ranch house in lower michigan (A2) thats on a crawl space and it has 4 outside vents in it. the visqueen that was put down in 1976 is all ripped up and i would like to just put new over the top of the current stuff or do i nee to remove whats already down before i can put new down?
the exterior walls have a little foam on them but nothing on the floor (insulation).
In the summer its very damp in the crawl space.

If this dampness is due to the existing visqueen being all ripped up .... then it shouldn't be an issue to cover over it.
If the dampness is from water entering from outside then you should resolve that issue before recovering the ground in the crawl space.

jams002
Re: Visqueen in crawl space replacement

well have you even try to search in some online services like crawl space replacement or home improvement,,

_____________________
Crawl Space Dehumidifier

Timothy Miller
Re: Visqueen in crawl space replacement

Howdy, adding another layer to the palstic would be an ok option. I would overlap any seams at least 5" and use a 50 year silicone/ latex caulk to seal the seams. Id allow 1' extra plastic up at walls and pour a continous 3" pile of sand on the new visquesn by the wall to retard moisture transfer. Is your crawlspce cross vented? How wet is it. Have you made sure that any rain gutter down spouts do not drain right next to the foundation, ( they soud extend at least 8' from, the foundation) an make sure any sprinkliers only spray way not onto the foundation? Don't plant plants that need watering next to the house.

prasad581
Re: Visqueen in crawl space replacement

I don't see a problem with applying the new layer over top of the old making sure to get as continious a coverage as possible.

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