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nloding
Vinyl plank installation and base boards
nloding

About to start my first VPF installation. The VPF we bought was CoreTec One, which has a cork backing, making it thicker than the usual VPF that I've seen. For instance, this can't just be scored and snapped, we need a saw. We also have a scuba underlayment to help minimize the clicking noise in the basement.

While laying things out and testing, I found that the VPF fits very snugly underneath the baseboards without the underlayment. The underlayment may make it impossible for the VPF to fit underneath.

I know I need to leave some room on the sides for the VFP to grow/shrink with the temperature. Should I be putting the planks right along the baseboard instead of tucking it under? If it should go under the baseboard, is the best idea to pop the baseboards off, install the flooring, then put the baseboards back?

THANKS!!

dj1
Re: Vinyl plank installation and base boards
dj1

The best way is to remove the existing baseboards, and if they are in excellent shape, just clean them, paint them and set aside. Lay your new floor - keep about 1/4" gaps to walls. Then re-install the baseboards.

Second best: if some baseboards break during removal, replace them, and if you can't match them, just get a new set of baseboards.

If you rather not remove the baseboards and just lay the floor up to them (again, with a 1/" gap), then you can use a quarter baseboard (shoe molding), large enough to cover all gaps.

nloding
Re: Vinyl plank installation and base boards
nloding

If we opt to not remove the baseboards and cover with the quarter round, is there concern about any shifting of the floor over time? I can't imagine so, with the scuba and the weight of all the interlocked planks. Other than the aesthetic of the quarter round, what's the downside to not removing the baseboards?

dj1
Re: Vinyl plank installation and base boards
dj1

You can insert plastic spacers into the gaps, one every say, 2 feet (and at least 2 per plank). You can even make your own wood chips to fit. They will hold the new floor in place.

nloding
Re: Vinyl plank installation and base boards
nloding

So the downside is really just aesthetics. Hooray, more to think about!

dj1
Re: Vinyl plank installation and base boards
dj1

Sorry to add more work. I hope you are comfortable working with a miter saw.

nloding
Re: Vinyl plank installation and base boards
nloding

Oh definitely. The only part I'm really worried about is undercutting the door frames, but the rest is going to be pretty simple. It's a very open floor plan luckily. Thanks for the advice on this! We decided we're going go with the quarter round, because the basement is the only area of the house without quarter round right now.

dj1
Re: Vinyl plank installation and base boards
dj1

"The only part I'm really worried about is undercutting the door frames"

There is a saw called Japanese saw, made especially for jamb cutting jobs. It resembles a trowel. Get one of those. Before I got mine, I used hack saw blades and wood chisels...they worked.

Mastercarpentry
Re: Vinyl plank installation and base boards
Mastercarpentry

I undercut the jambs and a couple inches of the base to either side, then use shoe molding for the rest. An oscillating saw (multi-master) makes this easy. Most Pro's have a Jamb Saw for this but they're expensive. As long as the total clearance doesn't exceed the width of the shoe molding the flooring can't 'escape'. I use 3/4" quarter-round for shoe. Never had a problem doing it like this. For a room or three a cheap multimaster tool from Harbor Freight will do fine, but if you're going to be using it regularly a better grade of tool is well advised.

Phil

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