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motoguy128
Re: Updating Kitchen Lighting

Only if the other white wire was on the same branch circuit. OTherwise you run the risk of overloading that particular neutral if it's used as a "Common" on too many circuits.

IT's true that the nuetrals all get wired ot a common buss bar at hte service panel. But the nuutral is not "balancing" the circuit. It's in fact the return path for the electricity. The nutral completes the circuit. IN thory, you could put the swithc on the neutral or the hot wire. Electricity doesn't care what color wire you use or where the switch is located. There is either continuity, or there isn't. It also doesn't care what size the wire is or if it's overloaded.. hat why you have breakers. ELectricity will flow throuhg any size conductor, but more current = more heat since a particular size wire has a given resistant ot current flow. Generate enough heat, and the insulation melts...an/or the wire itself melts. That's why you have breakers or fuses, to prevent wires from overheating and failing.

JLMCDANIEL
Re: Updating Kitchen Lighting

Here is what you can do. Run 2 conductor Romex from the outlet to to the switch box. Use the Romex black wire to the dimmer Line connection, the white to the dimmer neutral connector and the the white taped wire to the light, connect the black wire from the light box to the Load connector on the dimmer. At the light disconnect both wires from the light. Connect the white taped wire to the neutral connector on the light. Disconnect the black wire from the house hot in the light box, cap the house hot and connect the black wire from the switch to the black on the light.

Jack

JLMCDANIEL
Re: Updating Kitchen Lighting

Oh, and make sure the power is off to both the light and the outlet while you do this .
Jack

canuk
Re: Updating Kitchen Lighting
sparky1 wrote:

Id just get a differnt switch than pull new wire in. unless you want to make a 10 minute job into a 6 hour job.

Ditto that ---------

Re: Updating Kitchen Lighting

Milan, have you tried carefully touching the two wires together to see if the light will go on & off? If it's not a "switched leg" you will blow the fuse!

If that works, you may get by with the dimmer you have but the light (in the dimmer, if that's what the white wire is for) simply won't come on.

Good Luck from Columbiana, Alabama
Maurice Turgeon,http://thesemi-retiredelectrician.com

William
Re: Updating Kitchen Lighting
JLMCDANIEL wrote:

Here is what you can do. Run 2 conductor Romex from the outlet to to the switch box. Use the Romex black wire to the dimmer Line connection, the white to the dimmer neutral connector and the the white taped wire to the light, connect the black wire from the light box to the Load connector on the dimmer. At the light disconnect both wires from the light. Connect the white taped wire to the neutral connector on the light. Disconnect the black wire from the house hot in the light box, cap the house hot and connect the black wire from the switch to the black on the light.

Too bad that I didn't know that you posted this, it would have saved some work. Never received an e-mail from the forum about your post. Anyway, ended up tearing the floor apart upstairs and running new 14/2 from the light to the switch. Taped the wire to a fishing pole to get the wire through the insulation :p I'll connect the (old) white wire to the new white going to the switch together. Ground the ground, and use the new black as the feed from the switch to the light. Then I'll tape the end of the old black wire that used to feed the light and tuck it away somewhere. I think that should take care of everything right?

There are around 7 or 8 lights on this same fuse, so I am updating all of them at the same time. I'm just taping off the same white wire so it shouldn't be too hard, just time consuming running the wire.

William
Re: Updating Kitchen Lighting
The Semi-Retired Electric wrote:

Milan, have you tried carefully touching the two wires together to see if the light will go on & off? If it's not a "switched leg" you will blow the fuse!

There were only two wires at the light and at the switch box. One was going from the switch to the light. The other (in the switch box) was the feed wire going to the main panel. So that would mean that the last wire (in the ceiling) has to be the white wire, right? :confused:

Re: Updating Kitchen Lighting
MyMilan wrote:

There were only two wires at the light and at the switch box. One was going from the switch to the light. The other (in the switch box) was the feed wire going to the main panel. So that would mean that the last wire (in the ceiling) has to be the white wire, right? :confused:

True. Have you tried touching the wires together at the switch location to simulate the switch?

Good Luck from Columbiana, Alabama
Maurice Turgeon,http://thesemi-retiredelectrician.com

JLMCDANIEL
Re: Updating Kitchen Lighting
MyMilan wrote:

There were only two wires at the light and at the switch box. One was going from the switch to the light. The other (in the switch box) was the feed wire going to the main panel. So that would mean that the last wire (in the ceiling) has to be the white wire, right? :confused:

Do you mean two wires or two cables? If you only had two wires at the switch box and two wires at the light box, you are dealing with K&T wiring, and a complete rewire is called for.

Jack

William
Re: Updating Kitchen Lighting
JLMCDANIEL wrote:

Do you mean two wires or two cables?

See below;

Quote:

If you only had two wires at the switch box and two wires at the light box, you are dealing with K&T wiring, and a complete rewire is called for.

They stopped using K&T in the 30’s and this house was built in the late 50’s so I don’t think it’s K&T. This is more like the old cloth romex. What I’ve done so far is run new 14/2 from the switch box to the light. I just need to run the 14/2 inside the switch box (see below).

The other two wires (nuetral/ground) are going to another light switch (on the same fuse) on the other side of the wall. I am also running new grounds and neutrals to each switch box in the branch (there are 4 in total).

The Semi-Retired Electric wrote:

True. Have you tried touching the wires together at the switch location to simulate the switch?

No, haven't gotten that far yet. Still need to run another neutral and ground to another switch on the branch first. Hopefully Monday I can button this project up...

Wouldn't it be a whole lot safer to test it 'through the switch' instead of touching the live wires? :confused:

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