Home>Discussions>EXTERIORS>Turn of last century faux clay tile METAL roof
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anothercalifornian
Turn of last century faux clay tile METAL roof
anothercalifornian

My house is a 1928 Craftsman style brick home with a 'hard to get info on' metal roof. It was built with a tin? or similar metal tiled arrangement, maybe 5-9 individual designed pieces, that looks like clay tile. While still water proof, this light weight tile material is weathered and has been stepped on too often. I have scoured for examples of this 1850-1950 work and have come up dry. If anyone knows preparation to restore, un-dent the tiles or an older tin or metal smith manuals on this great old roofing style I would appreciate anyone with experience to comment.

I have tried to post, insert or upload a picture in several formats but it fails either inserting or pasting from my computer.

Maybe someone can clue me in on this old craft, old journeyman manuals or in my case someone who has encountered repair, priming or restoration of this metal. I am not looking to replace it with something else as restoration of this house is my intention.

Thanks,
Michael

A. Spruce
Re: Turn of last century faux clay tile METAL roof
A. Spruce

To post pictures, you have to upload them to a photo host site, then link them here.

Are you sure that your metal "tiles" are original to the house? There is a product(s) designed specifically for this purpose, they overlay wood shake with a metal roof that either simulates tile or wood shake. There are also metal shakes . . .

Google "metal shake roof", that is what I did and came up with this link.

llmotoll
Re: Turn of last century faux clay tile METAL roof
llmotoll

I agree with Spruce. Pretty far fetched this is the original tin roof. They typically only last about 30-40 years with routine maintenance. However there are standing seam tin roofs that have lived darn close to 100 years on a steep slope structure. The majority of tin roof deterioration comes from moisture from underneath the tin.

There was a tin shingle made in the 20's that would be similar to this but it was quite large. Talking the size of 2' x 5' each with an exposure of 14". Another round of tin shingle were mass manufactured in the 50' & 60's

When a tin roof is at the end of its life cycle. There is no way to reliably repair/refurbish it.

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