Home>Discussions>PLUMBING>Toilet installation in basement
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RonL
Re: Toilet installation in basement

Oh I thought it was PVC pipes, it says "medium Grey PVC solvent cement for PVC pipe and fittings" on the glue I used...

So now is that bad??

Re: Toilet installation in basement
RonL wrote:

Most plumbers agreed that this installation should in fact work and that the leak is due to an improper rubber installation. They added that I should remove the rubber and add some silicon material (gasket maker) plus clean the pipe and make it fit more accurately. They mentioned that I should get this done and test it out a couple of times for leaks. The new toilet line should also be slightly in an incline towards the outside just to make the water flow better.

I did what I was told and so far no leak. I'll testing it some more before finishing the job.

The pipes are PVC sold in home depot same goes for the glue used.

sure it will probably work. is it to code no! and these plumbers are ignorant.. for telling you to use silcone gaskets. go to plumbing suppler and get the correct transition bands.. i strongly suggest that you use a wye and 1/8th (45) bend to make the connection instead of the illegaly installed sanitary tee and at least a long sweep 1/4 (90) for the closet bend

RonL
Re: Toilet installation in basement

For vent, there is a an opening right beside the new installation which is currently closed with a cap (on the pipe going downwards to the ground). I was going to open that cap and install a sink. Will that be considered a vent since the sink has an opening (the sinks drain)?

I am heading today to the local hardware store to determine another way to this design which I was given by one of the plumbers. It should take care of most of the current issues.

So now I only have to figure the vent part out.

P.S. Since here in Montreal temps are pretty cold in winter, what is better PVC or ABS?

JLMCDANIEL
Re: Toilet installation in basement

A sink is not a vent, it should have a "p" trap that is full of water to prevent venting through the sink. It should have a vent after the trap.
Jack

JLMCDANIEL
Re: Toilet installation in basement

djrenek1,
I suggest you edit your post, profanity is not considered good form on an open forum.
Jack

RonL
Re: Toilet installation in basement
JLMCDANIEL wrote:

A sink is not a vent, it should have a "p" trap that is full of water to prevent venting through the sink. It should have a vent after the trap.
Jack

True I did not think of that, so I'll probably add a Studor Mechanical Vent right before the "p" trap. That can be done later once I work on the sink piping.

Re: Toilet installation in basement

i have never seen yellow abs solvent period... i'm in sf CA
as for editing my posts for cussing i can care less.. i'm done with all the igronance as well.. bye

RonL
Re: Toilet installation in basement

I got the yellow solvent and I also redid the installation. I am now installing the pipes. I also added a backwater valve just in case there are any city floods since this bathroom is in the basement. For some reason here in Montreal the PVC piping are scarce and ABS is the #1 choice. Maybe it has to do with the cold weather we have in winter, I really don't know why for sure.

djrenek1 thanks for your valued help. I got a Y connection like you mentioned but I changed the placing of the new toilet so now it should be OK (was told to do it this way by several plumbers). I also got better rubber boots made for plastic to metal connections. Since this new toilet is less then 6 feet from the main vent piping, I was told that I do not need another vent installation.

So the new setup should be much better then the old one. I'll post pictures once I am finished, hopefully I won't get too much negative criticism :)

RonL
Re: Toilet installation in basement

here is the new setup:

misfitter
Re: Toilet installation in basement

i just love a hot topic like this. i like the Fernco Bands. emergency repairs or add on they work outstanding. make sure to tighten them down to the 60 lbs. torque. Plumb Best sells a inexpensive3 tools for that for 15$ US or so. It is called a torque wrench.

next. god love the DIY projects. that is how i got into plumbing. check out the drawings and make sure you understand what a vent is.

here is the misfitter's defination example of a vent: "if you have a soda with a straw in it and you put your finger over the end of the straw sticking out, and then lift the straw, the soda stays in the straw. when you take your thumb off of the end of the straw the soda flows out. if the soda was the sewage water the same would apply to the drainpipe(the straw)and the vent(your thumb and the end of the straw)." a studor vent is great, but you are at the bottom of your system. you really need to tie into the vent going out of the roof somewhere or it will always be a slow drain.

where is the lav/sink? is the toilet/wc 12" off the wall? keep it simple with your installation, but also take your time and get it right.

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