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Hutchva
Tin Roof Painting

I own a historic home built in 1794 which has a heavy metal roof. Over the last several applications, I've been having trouble with the paint peeling or flaking off only a year or two following application. Any suggesting on a quality paint to use or application techniques. All painting has been done by licensed contractors. Thanks

Web Designing
Re: Tin Roof Painting

Calbar Metal Siding Paint represents the best technology in high performance water-based paint. This 100% acrylic paint is formulated and developed specifically for use on exterior metal siding panels. This paint features excellent one-coat coverage with tenacious adhesion and dries quickly for a long lasting protective and decorative finish.

J Roper
Re: Tin Roof Painting

Depending on where you are, Google Rhino Shield and see if a dealer is in your area. They have several specialty primers and adhesives for differant applications for roofing and will carry some length of warranty. The top coat has ceramics which is Energy Star rated and is about 12 mils thick! They will want to do the application due to the warranty but is probably worth it considering your situation.
The product line is super high quality and I have used them in Ga. on many projects. (especially when going "Green")
P.S. They also carry metallic finish coats.

Gary Winnick
Re: Tin Roof Painting

Uses of salt in paint is very good. It make paint very strong and durable. So my suggestion is use any paint but include salt in it.

jessjane
Re: Tin Roof Painting
Quote:

I own a historic home built in 1794 which has a heavy metal roof. Over the last several applications, I've been having trouble with the paint peeling or flaking off only a year or two following application. Any suggesting on a quality paint to use or application techniques. All painting has been done by licensed contractors. Thanks

Which type of paint you use is not necessary. The Pre requisite is how do you paint? First remove all rust and dirt. Use a wire brush to scrub away rust and wash away dirt with a strong cleaner that will not leave a residue. Bleach will remove any mold. Prime the surface with an oil-based or latex anti-corrosive primer. Allow the primer to dry thoroughly for at least 24 hours. Primer is typically heavy and does not always feel wet or tacky before it is completely dry. Tint the primer with the same colors if you are using a custom paint. This tinting will allow you to use fewer coats of paint. Decide on what kind of finish you want. A good paint in flat, semi-gloss or high-gloss will go smoothly over the primer once it is dry. Use always good brushes for the paint.

joshua samuel
Re: Tin Roof Painting

Hmmmm thanks jessjane. Nice information. Keep it up. These paint are costly but they are very beneficial for our home beauty.

ordjen
Re: Tin Roof Painting

Hutchva,

Whenever I am presented with a problem with which I am not too familiar, I like to go to the various manufacturer's websites. Most have search modes which allow you to query a topic such as "roofs". One such is: www.BenjaminMoore.Com

It is unclear in your post if the peeling is to bare metal or previous paint jobs. Is your roof galvanized or aluminum? Were the prior coats oil,vinyl latex or acrylic based? The answer to such questions determine what your next step should be.

I am assuming that the underlying roof is galvanized. To that end, here is some general advice from Benjamin Moore:http://www.benjaminmoore.com/bmpsweb/portals/bmps.portal?_nfpb=true&_windowLabel=contentrenderer_1_10&contentrenderer_1_10_actionOverride=%2Fbm%2Fcms%2FContentRenderer%2FrenderContent&contentrenderer_1_10cnp=public_site%2Farticles%2Flearn_how%2Flh_ext_problem_solver&contentrenderer_1_10np=public_site%2Farticles%2Flearn_how%2Flh_ext_poor_galvanized_metal_adhesion&_pageLabel=fc_productsspecs

One thing which might be occurring if past paint jobs were done with oil paints and then a switch to acrylic was made. Acrylics are flexible, expanding and contracting greatly with temperature changes. They also grip tenaciously. Oils are brittle and get more so with age. If an acrylic is put on top of oil paint, especially several layers of oil paint, it can actually break the bond of the oil paint to the substrate as it expands. On older homes which have been painted with oil paint over the years, it is advisable to either stay with oil paint, or to strip the oil paint back down to bare wood, or metal, in your case.

I am not sure I have given you a direct answer, but merely insight as to what might be occurring. .

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