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Seth
Tiling a VERY non-level floor

I am soon to tile the floor of my bathroom. My fiance wants to use large tiles, maybe 1'x2'. I just finished installing cabinets in the kitchen (directly below the bathroom) and discovered the floor dips a full two inches.

Assuming the bathroom floor is that bad, what are your suggestions? Personally I don't care about it being perfect, but I'm guessing giant tiles will. I could be lazy and use mosaic tile, but how would I do it the "right" way?

Thanks!

HoustonRemodeler
Re: Tiling a VERY non-level floor

Welcome,

You'll fare best by heading on over to the John Bridge Tile Forum where you can start a new thread with as many pictures as you like.

Tell them we said hello.

dj1
Re: Tiling a VERY non-level floor

Before you invest any more money and hard labor, stop and find out why the floor sags so much. If you need professional help to look at it, then call somebody qualified.

This advise is given to you because you want to know how to do it "right".

Seth
Re: Tiling a VERY non-level floor

Sorry, I should have mentioned we had a full inspection and an engineer look the place over before buying it. It is structurally sound, no sign of rot or insect damage, it's just had 150 years to sag and settle, but not enough to require joist hangers. Some previous plumber completely severed one of the joists (it was held up by the plaster ceiling below) but we fixed that.

The engineer also recommended against trying to jack the house up and inch here or there as it would probably shatter all the plaster walls.

HoustonRemodeler
Re: Tiling a VERY non-level floor

Engineers (as a group) tend to be more book smart and not so much in the field experience.

To minimize cracking the plaster one simply jacks the beams . joists, piers back into position slowly, over the course of a few months. Not in a few minutes. It took years for the house to sag. You're not going to fix it in a day.

Or you can patch it on top and add even more weight to the system making it worse.

Its your house and your money.

Seth
Re: Tiling a VERY non-level floor

I wondered if it would be possible to slowly jack up one spot over the course of months. I have lolly columns, I could give them a quarter turn a week...

I'm not too worried about the structure, it seems incredible over built. dimensional 2x12 joists connected to 8x12 or 10x12 beams and randomly some 4x12 or so extra thick joists. We had the engineer verify we could remove a wall and he calculated our kitchen/dining room could safely be 88 feet wide based on the sizes of the beams.

HoustonRemodeler
Re: Tiling a VERY non-level floor

Yes

Houses move like teeth

Mastercarpentry
Re: Tiling a VERY non-level floor
HoustonRemodeler wrote:

Engineers (as a group) tend to be more book smart and not so much in the field experience.

To minimize cracking the plaster one simply jacks the beams . joists, piers back into position slowly, over the course of a few months. Not in a few minutes. It took years for the house to sag. You're not going to fix it in a day.

Or you can patch it on top and add even more weight to the system making it worse.

Its your house and your money.

This- and very much so. Will you be happy with the sagging? Moreso, would a potential buyer like seeing that? Most important is to know that adding more weight is likely going to add to the sagging, thus cracking the plaster anyway.

As I see it, what have you go to lose by doing it right and re-leveling the floors versus the real chance of having to do that later anyway and destroying an otherwise perfectly good tile job in the process? Old houses sometimes take more effort but they are worth it, so give them their due and do it right from the start.

Phil

Phil

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