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Gord
Thermal Pane Unit Installation
Gord

I am going to replace the single pane glass in a 2 over 2 double hung wood window with thermal pane units. I want the same look as the other windows in the house, so I am going to glaze it just like I would if it was a regular piece of single strength glass. I have already adjusted the depth to accept a 1/2" thick unit, allowing for 3/8" of glazing.
I have been told window glazing compounds will react negatively with the rubber material used to seal the thermal pane units. If this is true and regular linseed oil based glazing is not recommended, would a water based glazing, like Aqua Glaze be a better choice? Or is the water based glazing the one reacting negatively with the rubber material?
Thank you.

Sombreuil_mongrel
Re: Thermal Pane Unit Installation
Sombreuil_mongrel

Hi,
It is possible to get linseed oil putty, but the product sold at the corner hardware store and the big box alike is a combination of soybean oil and other oils, no linseed.
I would seek counsel from whoever is supplying the sealed units.
I would be tempted to use butyl sealant for the setting, mill glass bead out of plastic (maybe you can buy a suitable profile) Install the glass bead with stainless brads. If the butyl does its job and the glass rabbet is finish painted before setting, the glazing bead is just there for show.
I am unfamiliar with any water based glazing except that DAP stuff in the tube. I last used it around 1994. Yuk.
Casey

Mastercarpentry
Re: Thermal Pane Unit Installation
Mastercarpentry

There's a knack to using the glazing in a tube. Save for the best work and historical applications it is all I use now. It doesn't tool well so you have to get it right as you apply it. Here's the method which I found works best:

Starting at the bottom right doing then lower part, hold the tube perpendicular to the pane with a 1/8 turn counterclockwise. Begin squeezing and as soon as you see compound coming out rotate the tube clockwise to just past level and begin moving left across the sash. Keep a blob built up ahead of the tip, keep the tube angle consistent, and stop momentarily when you need to re-squeeze the trigger. When you reach the left corner twist the tube clockwise as you quit squeezing and pull upward. 3 more times and the pane is done. If you need to 'tool' it, spit on your putty knife and make sure only that lubricated part touches the glazing- ant dry areas will grab the glazing and make a mess. The key is being consistent with the orientation and pressure of the tube tip. Concentrate on the blob ahead of the tube, not the bead you're leaving behind. Get that blob right and it will be fine behind you.

I can finally do a respectable-looking job with this stuff, and it's about ten times faster than using "33" even with me doing really well with that due to experience. As best I can tell, the tube glazing is at least equal to the "33" in longevity and it seems to bond with the wood even better. Plus it doesn't crack and fall out as quickly. The downside is that n so far I haven't been able to do a "perfect" job with it as far as appearance goes. This is where "33" and it's excellent tooling qualities still wins then game. Both have their place in your tool box, but once you get the hang of the tube stuff your can of "33" won't be opened much anymore and it may be dried out when you need it!

Phil

Sombreuil_mongrel
Re: Thermal Pane Unit Installation
Sombreuil_mongrel
Mastercarpentry wrote:

There's a knack to using the glazing in a tube. Save for the best work and historical applications it is all I use now. It doesn't tool well so you have to get it right as you apply it. Here's the method which I found works best:

Starting at the bottom right doing then lower part, hold the tube perpendicular to the pane with a 1/8 turn counterclockwise. Begin squeezing and as soon as you see compound coming out rotate the tube clockwise to just past level and begin moving left across the sash. Keep a blob built up ahead of the tip, keep the tube angle consistent, and stop momentarily when you need to re-squeeze the trigger. When you reach the left corner twist the tube clockwise as you quit squeezing and pull upward. 3 more times and the pane is done. If you need to 'tool' it, spit on your putty knife and make sure only that lubricated part touches the glazing- ant dry areas will grab the glazing and make a mess. The key is being consistent with the orientation and pressure of the tube tip. Concentrate on the blob ahead of the tube, not the bead you're leaving behind. Get that blob right and it will be fine behind you.

I can finally do a respectable-looking job with this stuff, and it's about ten times faster than using "33" even with me doing really well with that due to experience. As best I can tell, the tube glazing is at least equal to the "33" in longevity and it seems to bond with the wood even better. Plus it doesn't crack and fall out as quickly. The downside is that n so far I haven't been able to do a "perfect" job with it as far as appearance goes. This is where "33" and it's excellent tooling qualities still wins then game. Both have their place in your tool box, but once you get the hang of the tube stuff your can of "33" won't be opened much anymore and it may be dried out when you need it!

Phil

I used the tube stuff when I had built 11 new wooden,multi-pane fixed sash and had to glaze them and get them installed in a hurry, like 88 panes in one day. It was awful stuff, but it got the job done. I felt bad using that junk on my reclaimed heart cypress sash, but the show must go on.
Casey

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