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ssflaw
table saw safety

in the most recent episode, Norm was watching the cabinet installer install base around the kitchen island. After he scribed the next piece, he went to the table saw to cut it. Although as usual, no guard was present, I was particularly dismayed to see him cutting the scribed line freehand, not using the fence. The show should have enough sense not to portray unsafe practices. Some homeowner with a new table saw will learn the meaning of kickback the hard way.

Re: table saw safety

Come on after all Norm is a real contractor --yes saftey should always be a priority but things get done everyday without OSHA.
The real world isn't roped off with yellow tape .Like it or not buildings and ships and a lot of stuff gets done with short cuts.Is it right ?-NO but sometimes a little speed is worthy .
9 times out of 10 its ok and the reason is always money in some way.Norm was probably stuck and had to do it for the show.

Several of the workers on this site may or may not agree but we have been stuck at one point or another. canuk-dwarfwatch-jackthe shack
to name a few -You guys seam to have been in the trenches what do you guys think?

www.infraredsurvey.com

havanagranite
Re: table saw safety

don't look at my angle grinders in the shop that the guys have polishing pads on and expect to see guards. safety is very important but sometimes in certain circumstances they also aren't practical from a monetary stand point. with our angle grinders for instance the guard blocks the view of the edge of the wheel and when you are polishing you have to be able to see your work or quality will suffer

JLMCDANIEL
Re: table saw safety

Get real, you can't cut a curved or wavy line with a fence. A lot of freehand work is done like that. As far as the guard goes if you check you'll probably find the guard missing on a large number of table saws because the safety the American style guard offers is far outweighed by the inconvenience it poses. European table saws have long gone to the riving knife rather than the mickey mouse setup almost all American saws use.
Jack

havanagranite
Re: table saw safety
JLMCDANIEL wrote:

Get real, you can't cut a curved or wavy line with a fence. A lot of freehand work is done like that. As far as the guard goes if you check you'll probably find the guard missing on a large number of table saws because the safety the American style guard offers is far outweighed by the inconvenience it poses. European table saws have long gone to the riving knife rather than the mickey mouse setup almost all American saws use.Jack

well mickey is american after all:D

JLMCDANIEL
Re: table saw safety
havanagranite wrote:

well mickey is american after all:D

Are you sure, the Chinese hold a mortgage on just about everything here.:eek:
Jack

A. Spruce
Re: table saw safety
havanagranite wrote:

don't look at my angle grinders in the shop that the guys have polishing pads on and expect to see guards. safety is very important but sometimes in certain circumstances they also aren't practical from a monetary stand point. with our angle grinders for instance the guard blocks the view of the edge of the wheel and when you are polishing you have to be able to see your work or quality will suffer

I agree, being able to see your work is far more important, in many cases, than the feeble attempts at "guards" that manufacturers install on their tools.

In our litigious society, manufacturers are trying to coddle the consumer as much as our lawmakers are, which has led to "safety guards" that are actually more dangerous than good. I do not use a blade guard on my table saw, nor do I use a riving knife, because both are far too limiting to the type of work I do the most. To compensate for the lack of safety equipment on the tool, I excersize great common sense as well care and caution for my own well being. Blade height is carefully set, push sticks and sacrificial boards are used, safety gear is worn, as well as an array of other techniques that keep me safe while using an obviously dangerous tool.

Please don't take these comments wrong, I strongly agree that personal safety is a top priority when using any tool or piece of equipment, however no safety device can compensate for a lack of caution or care on the part of the user. And to be fair to Norm, on every episode of Yankee that I've watched, whenever he's doing something on his saw there are no guards in place, but simultaneously there is a ticker tape running across the screen that the guards have been removed for the sake of the camera.

There is also something to be said for the individual who is experienced enough and confident in their abilities to do things that mere mortals would never consider. I myself would never, ever, under penalty of death, consider free-handing a piece through a table saw, however, I've seen a number of fine folks do it. And, just because I see them do it, I do not feel compelled to do it myself, which brings us back to common sense and personal comfort zones.:)

canuk
Re: table saw safety

The comments about safety and common sense discussed here pretty much says it .

Plenty of trades people use a portable contractor's table saw for cutting curves and circles with remarkable accuracy and results.

This may seem to be what lots of folks would consider not what the intended use for this type of saw is for .... but for someone who is skilled and experienced this can be done safely.... not necessarily recommended for the novice.

Besides it works out well not having to cart around and set up different saws ... if you've worked on a job-site you would be able to appreciate this.

Yes ... there are safety items designed into the tools to prevent injury ... but I've seen people injured with those devices in place.

ssflaw
Re: table saw safety

my gripe isn't with the guy cutting freehand on the table saw. They're his fingers, not mine. But TOH is, to some extent at least, attempting to show DIY'ers how to do stuff, like scribing a piece of base. I still say it is irresponsible for Norm to have the guy show how it's done in such an unsafe manner, when these guys have all the tools in the world that could have been used instead.

canuk
Re: table saw safety

Well ..... I'm wondering if Norm's glasses are OSHA/UL approved ...

Sherry
Re: table saw safety

Hey, let’s not pick on Norm. He was the interviewer. He’s not the one who pushed the wood through freehand. (I cringed when I saw that.) He was showing us how the cabinet installer did his work, not how Norm would recommend it being done. That said I wish Norm had said that this freehand method was not something for the average DIYer to do at home. (One of the guys I use to work with lost 3 fingers on his table saw freehanding.)

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