Home>Discussions>KITCHENS>Subfloor, two foundation types in kitchen
4 posts / 0 new
Last post
KFB
Subfloor, two foundation types in kitchen
KFB

We live in a very old house built in 1900. It seems that we have had issue after issue after moving here three years ago, plumbing issues, foundation issues, etc. We recently had foundation work done, but now notice the beams in the floor in the kitchen. This is making us think that our subfloor needs to be replaced, but neither one of us really knows much about any of it. The other issue in the kitchen is that it seems one part of it was added on later and the foundation that was used for the addition is slab, but the rest of the house is pier and beam. Because of this, when we got the house leveled, that part in the kitchen is not completely level. In fact, we have a lip where the two foundations meet and now the linoleum floor is cracking and splitting. Any advice on how we should proceed to make the floors in our kitchen tip top?

dj1
Re: Subfloor, two foundation types in kitchen
dj1

Can't tell you without inspection.

From what you are saying, if you have beam failure and not so matching slab, you will always have a drop in the floor, unless you match the two.

Consult a couple of general contractors, who have experience in such things.

Mastercarpentry
Re: Subfloor, two foundation types in kitchen
Mastercarpentry

If indeed part of the floor is a concrete slab, then that interface will have to be aligned and solidly tied to the wood joisting beside it. That direct masonry contact also requires pressure-treated lumber be used there so you've got a lot of work ahead of you doing that unless you can access it from underneath. Tapcon fasteners are a godsend for this so long as the concrete is sound enough to hold them. Alternately you could demo the concrete and rebuild with wood if there's enough groundspace underneath.

Not sure what you mean by "notice the beams in the floor"; are you saying that the floor has a hump or is it that the floor is sagging between the joists? The latter will require a new subfloor and the former might be best addressed by adding beams to raise the adjoining joists in a blend to the far edges, as lowering a beam to achieve flatness might have an adverse affect elsewhere. This doesn't give a perfectly flat floor but usually works well enough with anything but large tiles on top.

DIY 4/10ths mostly because of the beams. posts, and foundations they will need as well, or the extensive work needed if the subfloor has to be replaced or the slab demo'ed. Regardless the surface flooring will have to be replaced to fasten the subflooring to the treated joist added at the slab.

Phil

MichaelInOr
Re: Subfloor, two foundation types in kitchen
MichaelInOr

When we gutted and replaced everything in my GF's 40 year old double wide the two halves of the house didn't line up. They were about 1/8" to about 3/8" out of line but the house and foundation were stable. I used several sheets of roofing felt to level the floor halves. Ifirst put down a 6' sheet of the roofing felt. Then a 5', then a 4' piece etc. to form a pretty flat floor. Leveling compound would not have worked because of the vinyl on the floor. We used a floating manufactured wood floor through out the house and have not had any issues in the 5 years it has been down.

Sponsored Stories

TV Listings

Find TV listings for This Old House and Ask This Old House in your area.