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kentvw
Re: Sub panel install

Kind of odd.

If the original stove was fed from your original panel and that panel had the main breaker in it then the neutral should have been bonded to the ground at that point.

At that point in time it was acceptable to only run a three wire feed to the range if it was fed from that same panel and not a sub panel with a three wire feed, the ground and neutral doing double duty on one conductor. Yet you have four conductors and copper no less.

So now you say the bond was never made between the neutral and ground? The danger of that? Any short circuits between either hot and a grounding conductor would have never tripped the circuit breaker protecting the circuit.

Except: if the bonding strap was left installed between the ground and neutral inside of the range and individual conductors were taken back to their respective ground and neutral lugs in your panel then that would have provided an accidental bond between the ground and neutral. If that was the case, and it is pure speculation on my part, then any receptacle that was tested with a plug-in tester would have looked “normal” as long as the range was plugged in with a four wire receptacle and cord set.

Ernie_Fergler
Re: Sub panel install
dannt1660 wrote:

Well... after further investigation it seems that the ground was never attached at the main breaker panel. Seems someone did not attach it when this house was built in 1971. What possible danger could this have caused since an electric stove was always connected?

Thanks for all your insight and help on this one. When in doubt look further (carefully!!!:cool: ).

Dann

Great to hear you found the problem :)

dannt1660
Re: Sub panel install
kentvw wrote:

Kind of odd.

If the original stove was fed from your original panel and that panel had the main breaker in it then the neutral should have been bonded to the ground at that point.

At that point in time it was acceptable to only run a three wire feed to the range if it was fed from that same panel and not a sub panel with a three wire feed, the ground and neutral doing double duty on one conductor. Yet you have four conductors and copper no less.

Sorry, a little confusion here. The original stove run was #6 3wire aluminum. The ground was connected at the stove but not at the main panel. My plan was to take the same wire and feed a 50 amp sub panel. I figured on a little less work not having to go into the main panel as the wire was all ready connected to a 50 amp breaker that was used for the stove circuit. Now I have to go and do it anyway since the ground wire is not attached. Ground and neutral are bonded in my, dare I say, "ZINSCO" main panel. I have checked the bus bars in this unit and they look OK.

Thanks again for sharing your knowledge.

Dann

:D

Dave357
Re: Sub panel install

Want a good reason to replace your Zinsco Circuit Breaker Panel?

Typing "Zinsco +Fire" into Google returns 7,690 hits.

If that doesn't give you enough incentive, nothing will.

djohns
Re: Sub panel install

Peace of mind is priceless . Change it and sleep better knowing your family is safer .

Ernie_Fergler
Re: Sub panel install
Dave357 wrote:

Want a good reason to replace your Zinsco Circuit Breaker Panel?

Typing "Zinsco +Fire" into Google returns 7,690 hits.

If that doesn't give you enough incentive, nothing will.

Zinsco !!!!! Oh brother !!!
Not to scare you, but those panel boxes keep electricians in business. Replacing that panel is paramount !!!!

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