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Bigwilliamu
Sub floor rot

Hey, my sub floor is rotted in a few spots. How can I replace it while trying to salvage and use the flooring on it?

A. Spruce
Re: Sub floor rot

Depends on what kind of flooring you have and how it's installed whether or not you'll be able to salvage it.

Where is the damage and what is the finished floor?

Bigwilliamu
Re: Sub floor rot

The flooring appears to be a laminate hardwood, maybe. 2 inches wide on the face and about a quarter inch thick. The rot is mostly along an exterior wall and by the adjoining wall where the tub is. I just found out that the tub area drops right into the crawlspace beneath my house. will this be problematic too?:confused:

A. Spruce
Re: Sub floor rot

Is the flooring face nailed? Is it tongue and groove? Is it glued down or floating?

What do you mean by "the tub area drops right into the crawlspace"? Has it fallen through the floor? Is there no drain connected to it?

Can you post pictures?

Without us being able to see what you're talking about, you must be as specific and descriptive as possible.

Bigwilliamu
Re: Sub floor rot

I am trying to load pics shortly. No, the tub hasn't fallen through the floor. The area beneath the tub has no sub floor and opens into the crawlspace and adjoining wall. The flooring seems to be tongue and groove and faced nailed in areas.

A. Spruce
Re: Sub floor rot
Bigwilliamu wrote:

I am trying to load pics shortly. No, the tub hasn't fallen through the floor. The area beneath the tub has no sub floor and opens into the crawlspace and adjoining wall. The flooring seems to be tongue and groove and faced nailed in areas.

I've never seen the entire bottom of a tub exposed, usually just about a one foot square where the drain drops through the floor, either way, I can't see this being an issue unless you've got standing water under the house.

All you can do is try to salvage the finished hardwood. With any luck, it's only nailed, if that's the case, once you get the first piece out, you can usually pry the next one up more easily. Pull finish nails (headless nails ) through from the back side, don't try to back them out or you'll seriously damage the surface. Headed nails have to be backed out.

Bigwilliamu
Re: Sub floor rot

Any ideas on how to replace the sub floor? It runs at a 45 degree angle beneath the original hardwood which runs ninety degrees from the flooring I am trying to save. I am not sure what or how to attach either the new boards or I am assuming ply-board to replace the rotted material.

A. Spruce
Re: Sub floor rot

Remove the finish floor to expose the damaged under-layers plus some extra work room.

Remove damaged second layer of floor and subfloor. If you can cut the damaged area out over the centerline of floor joists GREAT! If not, you can either frame in some support structure so you only have to replace the damaged area. It doesn't matter that the subfloor is running 45* do the joists, any loose tails can be supported with framing to support the patch area.

Both the subfloor and second layer can be filled in with plywood. Do this in two layers, the first layer being the same thickness as the subfloor, the second layer being the same thickness as the second layer.

If the damage extends under walls, that can be a tricky fix, but not impossible. If damage extends under cabinets or fixtures such as the tub or toilet, that will take some extra work too, depending on the extent of the damage.

Bigwilliamu
Re: Sub floor rot

Thank you Spruce!

A. Spruce
Re: Sub floor rot

Your welcome. Report back with your progress.

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