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onnarrowpath
Stud Stumper
onnarrowpath

We own a house built in the 1880's. We have removed the plaster and lathe, but the studs are so uneven. How would you put drywall on these studs and not make the surface look all wavy?

A. Spruce
Re: Stud Stumper
A. Spruce

You cut shims to even out the studs. Use a long straight edge to span 5 or more studs at a time, measure several points along each stud, cut shims, tack into place with brad nails and wood glue. You could also pull several string lines along the wall at the top, middle, and bottom of the wall to get a more even plane to measure to.

HandyAndyInMtAiry
Re: Stud Stumper
HandyAndyInMtAiry

Why in the world would you remove all the plaster? That was just totally stupid. please explain why you would do that? Sounds like you have been watching too many of these stupid tv shows. There are so many folks that want plaster instead of nasty, cheap sheetrock. The studs are also the very best in true dimensional wood. Please don't cut them up.

Plaster has so many more great advantages over sheetrock, some of the biggest are no mold of any type can grow on plaster, it is a great insulator, it is naturally fire retardant, It keeps the older homes cool in the summer and warm in the winter.

We have horsehair lime plaster in our entire house, there is no way we are removing it. It is so nice and perfectly smooth. We have had to work to get the 9 layers of wallpaper off, but so well worth it.

Sorry to be so blunt

Handy Andy in Mt. Airy

A. Spruce
Re: Stud Stumper
A. Spruce
HandyAndyInMtAiry wrote:

Why in the world would you remove all the plaster?

There are many reasons to remove plaster, it's not your house, don't be so judgemental

Sombreuil_mongrel
Re: Stud Stumper
Sombreuil_mongrel

It too feel a little bit of the "you made your bed, now lie in it" kind of self-righteousness.
To get the framing flat so that newfangled drywall won't look like absolute shite, you can sister the studs with new straight ones, or Plane down the high spots and shim the low spots.
Keep in mind where the finished surface of the old plaster was in relation to the trim and door and window jambs. You ideally will plan to end up with the same room size and trim/plaster relationship; lath + plaster was 3/4"-1" thick, drywall is 1/2 or 5/8. If you sister new studs to old, bring them out proud of the old ones so the new drywall ends up matching the old jambs.
You could put up new lath and re-plaster. It is nice to learn a new trade from scratch.
New horsehair plaster in an old house:

dj1
Re: Stud Stumper
dj1

You can get craft paper 1-1/2"x 48"x 1/8" at HD then use them to get your wall to align.

Or, you can buy a mat board at art supply stores, then cut it to strips of 1.5".

Even corrugated can do it.

HoustonRemodeler
Re: Stud Stumper
HoustonRemodeler

They are called "drywall shims" which are really flat pieces of cardboard in 1/16" thickness.

dj1
Re: Stud Stumper
dj1
HoustonRemodeler wrote:

They are called "drywall shims" which are really flat pieces of cardboard in 1/16" thickness.

Oh yes, they have a name...just slipped my mind (haven't used them in quiet some time).

Even wood pieces (like paint stirs) can do the job.

A. Spruce
Re: Stud Stumper
A. Spruce
dj1 wrote:

Oh yes, they have a name...just slipped my mind (haven't used them in quiet some time).

Even wood pieces (like paint stirs) can do the job.

They're called stirring sticks . . . :p:o:cool:

HoustonRemodeler
Re: Stud Stumper
HoustonRemodeler

I'm lucky to remember what I had for breakfast most days. :confused:

Fencepost
Re: Stud Stumper
Fencepost
Sombreuil_mongrel wrote:

New horsehair plaster in an old house:

You know, that is going to totally confuse some future remodeler when they tear into what they think is an ancient plaster wall only to find 3-1/2" wide studs, Romex stapled in place, and "new work" plastic electrical boxes in the wall. It will be a "stud stumper" for sure!

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