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Nickatnightonly
Storm Door Condensation problem

I had an Anderson Storm door installed last fall , and during colder weather it gets very heavy Condensation , causing water to drip down the storm door glass , sometimes it's so heavy the water builds up at the bottom of the storm door , Is there anything I can do to prevent this from happening ? ... Thanks, Nick

keith3267
Re: Storm Door Condensation problem

Your primary door needs to be weather stripped. warm moist air from inside your house is escaping into the cavity between the doors and condensing against the storm door. You should also have some drainage at the bottom of the storm door.

jkirk
Re: Storm Door Condensation problem

keith got er'. hes right

Nickatnightonly
Re: Storm Door Condensation problem
keith3267 wrote:

Your primary door needs to be weather stripped. warm moist air from inside your house is escaping into the cavity between the doors and condensing against the storm door. You should also have some drainage at the bottom of the storm door.

Keith , Thanks for your response , but the inside door was replaced at the same time and has all new weather striping .. So do you think I need to have an airhole drilled into the new storm door ?

HoustonRemodeler
Re: Storm Door Condensation problem

Yes you need to let the heat out and the air in so the temperature is the same on both sides of the storm door. Remember the storm door shouldn't insulate. I know its tempting to make everything as air tight as possible, but this time isn't one of them.

keith3267
Re: Storm Door Condensation problem

Even a new primary door, as good as they are today with the weatherstripping available, are still going to leak some warm moist air into the cavity. You will find quite a bit of air leakage around the door handles and dead bolt locks.

I don't recommend drilling holes. The bottom of most storm doors have an adjustable sweep. You should be able to loosen two screws and slide the sweep up or down. The trick is to have the sweep low enough so that rain water will shed off the door and only to the outside of the sill, but still allow any moisture or water build up on the sill to flow out.

The weatherstripping used on storm door sides and top should allow enough ventilation to keep the cavity clear and dry. You may never completely solve the condensation problem, every time someone comes into the house, they normally close the storm door first and then the primary door so some warm moist air gets trapped regardless of how good your weatherstripping is, but it should not be allowed to build up at the bottom of the door.

One more thing, if the storm door is attached to the brick mold, which it probably is, then you must have a good bead of caulk between the brick mold and the door frame and again on the inside trim to the door frame and the inside trim to the wall, other wise warm moist air goes around the weather stripping on the outside of the door frame.

Nickatnightonly
Re: Storm Door Condensation problem
keith3267 wrote:

Even a new primary door, as good as they are today with the weatherstripping available, are still going to leak some warm moist air into the cavity. You will find quite a bit of air leakage around the door handles and dead bolt locks.

I don't recommend drilling holes. The bottom of most storm doors have an adjustable sweep. You should be able to loosen two screws and slide the sweep up or down. The trick is to have the sweep low enough so that rain water will shed off the door and only to the outside of the sill, but still allow any moisture or water build up on the sill to flow out.

The weatherstripping used on storm door sides and top should allow enough ventilation to keep the cavity clear and dry. You may never completely solve the condensation problem, every time someone comes into the house, they normally close the storm door first and then the primary door so some warm moist air gets trapped regardless of how good your weatherstripping is, but it should not be allowed to build up at the bottom of the door.

One more thing, if the storm door is attached to the brick mold, which it probably is, then you must have a good bead of caulk between the brick mold and the door frame and again on the inside trim to the door frame and the inside trim to the wall, other wise warm moist air goes around the weather stripping on the outside of the door frame.

Keith , Thanks, I see the screws at the bottom and will adjust them accordingly .... :-)

Tony_01
Re: Storm Door Condensation problem

If your primary door is left opened for much of the time the condensation will form on the storm door because of the variation in the temperature. You primary door may not be sealed correctly through which humid air can escape. Ventilate the space between two doors. You can also replace weather-stripping of your primary door or by installing a new one.

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