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lennon_sullivan
Step up to bathroom

I have an A frame 1925 cottage style house in Illinois. Our main bath design and fixtures upstairs are probably original to the house. There is Chicago style white tile for the floor. The problem is it is in need of replacement/repair. There is a 6" step up into the bathroom and I can't figure out why. The bathtub drain does have to cross the floor but the access panel reveals the trap and drain are most likely low enough not to cause the raise in the floor. When i was attempting to resecure our vanity bolt I discovered there were eithor layers of old tile over the existing floor our an inch or two of concrete. The built in vanity mirror seems proportional to the height of the floor and is probably original. Why is my floor so tall and can I remove the tile and whatever underlaminate is there to level our bathroom with the rest of the second floor? In the picture of the access panel the bottom edge of the casing represents the height of the second floor

JLMCDANIEL
Re: Step up to bathroom

Just a guess but it may be the bathroom was added later and the raised floor is to accommodate plumbing. In 1925 there were stll a lot of outhouses in use.
Jack

lennon_sullivan
Re: Step up to bathroom

Thanks,

We considered that at first. However, this house was part of a housing addition in a well established pre-existing community and this design is unique to this neighborhood. I believe it was part of the original construction. I wonder why (if) the plumbing was ran above the floor joists. I am sure it can be corrected if that is the case. However, I am looking for someone who has encountered the same design and wonder if it is due to plumbing.

JLMCDANIEL
Re: Step up to bathroom

Perhaps this is one place that drilling an inconspicuous hole and using a fiber optic camera would be valuable.
Jack

MLBSF
Re: Step up to bathroom

is there another bathroom directly below that one? the only reason that i can think of that they would raise the floor was because the waste pipe had a very long horizontal run and the floor joists were not deep enough to accomodate the long run, therefore, they had to raise the floor to be able to tap into the existing waste pipe which might have been pretty far away.

lennon_sullivan
Re: Step up to bathroom

No this bathroom is the only one in the main living space.I forgot to consider slope. Thanks. That might be it. Does anyone know the rise/run for bathroom drains?

MLBSF
Re: Step up to bathroom

1/4" per foot

lennon_sullivan
Re: Step up to bathroom

I checked it out. I only need three inches for the entire slope. Short of a borascope or someone who has encountered this before I am still stumped.

lennon_sullivan
Re: Step up to bathroom

Funny though, I said org it was 6" but when I actually measured the step it is only 3". Coincidence? If the joists ran parallel to the tub, and the drain had to cross 12' of joists diagnally could that be a reason why my drain may be above the joists? The joists for the main level floor run parallel to the tub. The second floor hardwood runs the same direction as the main floor (which would mean joists are parallel on the main floor and the second floor right?). My attic joists (second floor cieling) run peripendicular to the main floor joists. Does that sound right?
Any thoughts?

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