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A. Spruce
Stapled and Caulked Drywall

Does anyone remember that debate from a while back?:eek::D:D I am reminded of it almost daily when I am using the bathroom and staring at the wall, which was quite literally stapled, then caulk was used to cover the stapes and joints.

I guess I should qualify this statement, this is a "manufactured" home, which is the fancy way to say trailer. The bathroom walls have a vinyl covered drywall that is less than 3/8" thick. It was probably glued to the 1x4 wall framing before the staples and caulk were applied.

It will forever escape me why anyone is ever allowed to build something this poorly.:rolleyes:

dj1
Re: Stapled and Caulked Drywall

"It will forever escape me why anyone is ever allowed to build something this poorly.:rolleyes:[/QUOTE]"

It's as simple as supply and demand. In most instances consumers create the demand, then manufacturers jump to provide the supply, for the bucks.

To cut costs and increase the bottom line, they manufacture this product you call crap. However, one thing it does - it fills a certain demand, so some folks don't end up on a park bench at night or at Santa Monica beach.

Clarence
Re: Stapled and Caulked Drywall

I have never plastered in a manufactured home but you may want to check on this type product.
Manufactured by Variance.
It is an Acrylic Finish applied by the plaster trade.
Look for ANCIANO a textured finished plaster this will work over your precovered drywall it is a very flexable finish.

A. Spruce
Re: Stapled and Caulked Drywall
dj1 wrote:

To cut costs and increase the bottom line, they manufacture this product you call crap. However, one thing it does - it fills a certain demand, so some folks don't end up on a park bench at night or at Santa Monica beach.

Just because there is demand for shoddy, substandard housing, doesn't mean that manufacturers should be able to provide it. Society also wants cheap, high mileage cars, but the gubberment has stepped in and dictated a certain level of safety be maintained.

This does not exist in trailer manufacturing. I say trailer manufacturing, because that is exactly what these steaming piles of poo are, poorly constructed trailers, and no amount of fancy words can change that. We builders are not allowed to construct this utter garbage, not that I'm suggesting such an atrocity.

When was the last time you could install a drainage system that didn't have stack vents at every location? In a trailer, you might have one 2" stack that services the tub, toilet, and vanity. If you're lucky there is a Studor vent under the vanity.

You know when you want to splice into a wire in your truck to add on an accessory, you use one of those connectors that has a fork in the middle that you press down, stabbing the conductors and making the connection. All the outlets and switches are the same thing in a trailer.

Floor to window sill heights mean nothing. Framing is done with 1x4 or 2x3. Headers, what are those? Particle board suffices for subfloor, and not one nail is used, everything is stapled, with exception to the siding, which is riddled with nails because the idiots building these things can't find the undersized framing members. This list of sub-standard practices goes on. Why do they get away with it? Because they have huge lobbies that write their own codes and standards that trump local code requirements.

Then there's the cost. Cheap, right? $40,000 for a 3/2 and 1400 square feet. What a bargain! Oh, did you want that delivered to your property? Oh, you wanted that set up on your property too? You can easily double if not triple that initial buy in number, and what have you got to show for it? A property that now is worth LESS because of the trailer. A property that you will be lucky to get financed, forget about refinancing or a second mortgage when you need to pull some money out of this "investment". Did I mention resale value? Because you've got a trailer on the lot, you get considerably less resale value than with a conventionally built home.

So, can anyone explain just where these things are supposed to be "cheaper" than a conventional home?

JLMCDANIEL
Re: Stapled and Caulked Drywall

Spruce you are just jealous because you didn't come up with the idea of building a rack with 300 staple guns and 40 caulking guns to do the installation in one step.

Jack

A. Spruce
Re: Stapled and Caulked Drywall

:o You're right Jack.:D:D:D

Where the heck is jkirk and Canuk for this conversation? :D

Gizmo
Re: Stapled and Caulked Drywall

Spruceee my friend once they remove the tires there not considered trailers any more :rolleyes:

A. Spruce
Re: Stapled and Caulked Drywall
Gizmo wrote:

Spruceee my friend once they remove the tires there not considered trailers any more :rolleyes:

Tell that to your insurance guy and your lender, not to mention the specialty supplier you have to go to for repair parts on many of the components, unless you upgrade them to standard materials.

Your lender in particular still views it as a trailer, regardless of being on a permanent foundation because all anyone has to do is just toss some tires under and drive it off, leaving behind a bare lot. While we all know that is not the reality of things, lenders will take any advantage they can to charge you higher rates or avoid loaning to you at all, based on you living in a trailer.

Also, when it comes time to sell, your agent isn't going to find "comps" to easily because a trailer is a trailer, it is not a conventional home, thereby it cannot be comp'd against similarly sized/equipped conventional home sales.

Gizmo
Re: Stapled and Caulked Drywall
A. Spruce
Re: Stapled and Caulked Drywall

No amount of glitter and party streamers can turn a sows arse into a silk purse. It might look purty, but it's still built the same way, in the same factories as it's redneck counterparts. And all the other technicalities of lenders, insurance, etc. still apply, it's a trailer, that is all it ever was and all it ever will be.:cool:

JLMCDANIEL
Re: Stapled and Caulked Drywall

Mobil Home spruce.

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