Home>Discussions>ELECTRICAL & LIGHTING>From Standard to GFCI Circuit
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Blue RidgeParkway
Re: From Standard to GFCI Circuit

Yes they do. But you are only allowed to do this (load from the bathroom GFCI receptacle) if the circuit supplying the GFCI receptacle is dedicated to this bathroom only. If the circuit supplying this receptacle also supplies another bathroom's receptacle then you are not allowed to "tap" into it to supply other devices.

You can get a blank front GFCI if your dropping from a lighting or multipurpose circuit other than one that supplies the bathroom receptacle then to a combo switch for your light and exaust fan unit. What's the rating for this unit? Cannot exceed 50% of the circuit rating if its sharing the load.

Beer Belly
Re: From Standard to GFCI Circuit
Blue RidgeParkway wrote:

Yes they do. But you are only allowed to do this (load from the bathroom GFCI receptacle) if the circuit supplying the GFCI receptacle is dedicated to this bathroom only. If the circuit supplying this receptacle also supplies another bathroom's receptacle then you are not allowed to "tap" into it to supply other devices.

So, if I have a power feed into this GFCI, none going beyond it....then it's a go??

Beer Belly
Re: From Standard to GFCI Circuit
Blue RidgeParkway wrote:

You can get a blank front GFCI if your dropping from a lighting or multipurpose circuit other than one that supplies the bathroom receptacle then to a combo switch for your light and exaust fan unit. What's the rating for this unit? Cannot exceed 50% of the circuit rating if its sharing the load.

I'm not sure of the rating on this particular Light/Fan Combo, but if the GFCI is on it's own (not powering another outlet), I'm about 90% sure that the GFCI outlet will not be in use (anything plugged into it) while the Vent/Fan Combo is being used. Thanks for all the warnings and responses, keep 'em coming.:)

Blue RidgeParkway
Re: From Standard to GFCI Circuit
Blue RidgeParkway wrote:

Yes they do. But you are only allowed to do this (load from the bathroom GFCI receptacle) if the circuit supplying the GFCI receptacle is dedicated to this bathroom only. If the circuit supplying this receptacle also supplies another bathroom's receptacle then you are not allowed to "tap" into it to supply other devices.
You can get a blank front GFCI if your dropping from a lighting or multipurpose circuit other than one that supplies the bathroom receptacle then to a combo switch for your light and exaust fan unit. What's the rating for this unit? Cannot exceed 50% of the circuit rating if its sharing the load.

Beer Belly wrote:

So, if I have a power feed into this GFCI, none going beyond it....then it's a go??

Not what was said. The highlighted Red "it" referred tois thebranchcircuit "itself". If the "power feed" into this GFCI receptacle in the bathroom also supplies or "powers" or "feeds" any thing in any room other than THIS bathroom (whether the outlet or device is between the panel and the required GFCI protected bathroom receptacle, or is after the required GFCI protected bathroom receptacle, you are NOT good to go if anything that is being "fed" is not "IN" THIS BATHROOM.

You have two choices for supplying ("power feed" source) the required GFCI protected receptacles in bathrooms both involve dedicated supply circuits:

  1. One is to use a single circuit dedicated to a single bathroom, that can supply the required GFCI protected receptacle/s in that individual bathroom's zone and may supply (GFCI protected or not GFCI protected other outlets, such as lights, fans, etc. in that same Bathroom's zone only;
  2. The second option is to use a single dedicated circuit which supplies only GFCI protected receptacles in more than one Bathroom Zone, but supplies power "power feed" to Nothing other than the GFCI protected receptacles in bathroom zones (no receptacles in other areas, no other devices, fans, lights, etc.).
Beer Belly wrote:

I'm not sure of the rating on this particular Light/Fan Combo, but if the GFCI is on it's own (not powering another outlet), I'm about 90% sure that the GFCI outlet will not be in use (anything plugged into it) while the Vent/Fan Combo is being used. Thanks for all the warnings and responses, keep 'em coming.:)

Not what was said. The restriction has to do with what else is "powered" by the entirety of the circuit which "powers" the required GFCI protected receptacle(s). The use of the receptacle or non-use of the receptacle to work electricity at the time the exaust fan/light unit has nothing to do with the 50% rule for the exaust fan on a shared circuit.

I hope that explains it better for you, please let me know if it remains unclear or you have further questions. There are other restrictions and rules regarding the installation you describe. Height above the tub flood rim, the listing information for the unit, if there is a shower head or may be a shower wand installed, that you'll be installing it in a ceiling/attic, etc.

Beer Belly
Re: From Standard to GFCI Circuit

What I found today was a Wall Switch/GFCI Outlet Combo....could I use this ???. The Recess Light/Vent Fan is going directly above the Tub/Shower.
http://www.broan.com/display/router.asp?ProductID=100116

Blue RidgeParkway
Re: From Standard to GFCI Circuit
Beer Belly wrote:

What I found today was a Wall Switch/GFCI Outlet Combo....could I use this ???. The Recess Light/Vent Fan is going directly above the Tub/Shower.
http://www.broan.com/display/router.asp?ProductID=100116

Since you've provided no details about your application (ceiling height, shower wand, flood rim of tub), I'll assume your ceiling over the tub is equal to or less than 9. feet and your tub rim is equal to or more than 12" high from the floor so I'd say no good on the light/fan because the Light isn't enclosed or globed and nothing on your link says it is wet (not just damp) location listed, but I didn't bother to look up a listing number myself, and your link didn't offer one (& didn't see it on the spec page either).

You never did say what else was on the circuit either.

Beer Belly
Re: From Standard to GFCI Circuit

Your assumptions on the location are correct. I'm trying to use the original wiring that is already hooked up to an exsisting Vent Fan that is not located over the Tub.....I thought it would be a simple thing to do.....throw in a GFCI somewhere in between the Wall Switch and Fan/Light.....in this case, I'm looking strongly at the GFCI Outlet/Switch Combo....but now maybe should just scrap the whole idea, looks to be more trouble than it's worth.....just trying to the make the Wife happy. I just read the specs, looks to read that it is made for over the tub:confused:

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