Home>Discussions>YARD & GARDEN>Spring vegetable planting
10 posts / 0 new
Last post
dj1
Spring vegetable planting

We just finished planting phase 1 (for 2013) in our vegetable garden:

- tomatoes
- green beans
- xin cai (pronounced: shin tzai = like Chinese lettuce)
- green onion
- sunflowers (for the looks only).

What are some of the vegetables you are planting this year?

keith3267
Re: Spring vegetable planting

I have permanent beds for Asparagus and Artichokes though I have a few new Artichoke plants in the starter flat right now to replace the ones that didn't make it through the winter. I have Tomatoes in the flat also. I will probably direct plant some Sugar Snap Peas in the next week or so, absolutely love them. the branches I remove from the Apple trees make a good pea fence, it all goes to the compost together when the peas are done. I will direct plant yellow straight neck squash pretty soon too, after that, who knows what might appeal to me when I peruse the seed section at the garden center.

Yesterday I cleaned out my front bed. Still have the Yucca plant, some ground phlox and pansies from last year. Looks some of the glads are sprouting too. I planted some Asian Lilies and Hollyhocks and will put out some more glad bulbs when it stops raining. May add a few Coleus to fill in if the Canna's don't come back.

A. Spruce
Re: Spring vegetable planting

Staples for us are tomatoes, zucchini, yellow crook neck, cucumbers, Asian eggplant, colored peppers, and mild chili peppers.

Permanent beds include sunchokes, ginger, and horseradish. Some herbs are kept year round, like basil, thyme, sage, rosemary, mint

Fill-in are pumpkin, peas, beans, jicima (when we can find the seed ), and Swiss chard.

Never had any luck with potatoes or lettuce.

dj1
Re: Spring vegetable planting

Keith,
Asparagus and artichokes - how hard are they to grow? we usually don't eat these.

Spruce,
I wasn't familiar with sunchokes. Potatoes? leave them to Idaho growers.

Tomatoes are the easiest to grow around here. We have 12 new seedlings from last year's tomato plants. At around November, we remove the dry plants, and bury the last of the tomatoes, just to see new seedlings come out in the spring. Plus we brought in 6 new seedlings.

Next phase will include red bell peppers, squash, white corn and strawberries. Wish we had more space.

A. Spruce
Re: Spring vegetable planting

Space is at a premium for us as well. By the time the girlfriend puts in her 12 tomatoes, there isn't room for anything else! :D:rolleyes:

Sunchokes, they're hard to describe. They're a root, that look similar to ginger, that taste nutty. The stalks look like sunflowers and they do get a small yellow flower, but that flower is merely decoration. I'm not a fan, but sis and the GF like them.

keith3267
Re: Spring vegetable planting

Asparagus, the key is in making the bed in the first place. Its quite a bit of work but worth it. Once established, the beds produce for a long time. I now have two beds about 20' long and about 3' wide. Each bed started with 20 crowns. The two beds are about 7' apart. Between them is a 20x3' bed for tomatoes. The Asparagus protects the Tomatoes from root knot nematode, better than mari****s.

Artichokes are an iffy crop in this area. I am in a zone 7. a zone 8 or higher would be better, but this is where I am at so I have to deal with it. They don't produce on first year plants, the plants must over winter before they will produce. They can tolerate temperatures down to about 26°F. They can tolerate slightly lower temps for a short period of time, but not too long.

All my Artichokes made it through the winter of 2011/2012, but this year I lost about half of them even though I used row covers to protect them. Interestingly, I had one plant that was outside the bed so it didn't get protection and it made it through. I think that I lost some because we had some very cold nights this year and I put plastic over the row covers and left it on too long.

BTW, I also have strawberries, raspberries and blackberries, but the are in the landscaping and not in the garden. Lost my Blueberries last year, don't know if I will replace, they have never done well around here.

I also have apples, pears, plums and cherries. Apples require way too much care. Pears are good but are hard to keep after picking. The plums and cherries that I bought never did any good, but the local wild cherry and local plum do really great and are just as good as any I have ever had, so they are the only ones I have now.

My favorite is the Fig tree. I had two of them, a Mission Fig from California that I planted against the south side of my house to protect it and a Brown Fig from a swamp in Louisiana. I finally cut down the Mission Fig, they were nice large figs but not all that tasty. The brown fig is much more flavorful, but smaller. I'm going to build a greenhouse were the Mission Fig was.

Timothy Miller
Re: Spring vegetable planting

Howdy i can hardly wait. in addition to yours my favorites: zucinni - trick is pick them small an stir fry with butter- yummie. cucumbers, lettuce, cabbage , cauliflower broccoli. But hoping some isreale melons seeds will grow into wonderful melons look like cantelope outside inside honeydew but 10 times better then a must mellon...

gbecki49
Re: Spring vegetable planting

We try to get as much out of our space as we can, but we have all manner of utilities running just under the ground in our back yard. We have a 15X15 ft space that is utility free, and it is our main garden. In it, we have swiss chard, broccoli, bell peppers, green beans (pole), tomatoes and basil. We have 3, 16X4 ft raised beds. One is all strawberries, one has beets and more broccoli and one has okra and jalapenos. Also have 2 smaller raised beds, 8x4 ft and have cucumbers in 1 and zucchini in the other.

A.Spruce: was wondering what part of the country you live in, and if you have ever tried growing potatoes in a 55 gallon barrel? If you're short on space, this is a great way to grow them. If you're interested, holler and I can tell you how, OR, you can just look it up ******. If you have space and want to grow them in the ground, I can tell you how to be successful with that as well. Lord knows you've been a huge help to me over the years with my (finally solved) plumbing problems. Least I can do is help you out with your gardening woes! :)

JLMCDANIEL
Re: Spring vegetable planting

I hope my neighbors plant an over abundance in their gardens so I don't have to.

Jack

dj1
Re: Spring vegetable planting
JLMCDANIEL wrote:

I hope my neighbors plant an over abundance in their gardens so I don't have to.

Jack

That's one way to eat fresh.:)

TV Listings

Find TV listings for This Old House and Ask This Old House in your area.