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dj1
Spring Planting in our vegetable garden

How time flies when there is no rain. After a decade of below average rainfall, they predicted a winter El Nino, but so far we had HALF the rain we had in the drought years. Yet surprisingly, we had a very good harvest of sweet oranges. Our lemon tree produced smaller than average lemons. We also have a mandarin tree, which gives fruits once every two years - and it's blossoming right now.

Luckily we had some rain last week (1/2") and the ground got a little easier to dig, so we planted seeds and seedlings:

Tomatoes,
Chives,
Green onions,
Baby Choi,
Long String Beans,
Mini Bell Peppers.

Soon we will add Corn, Bitter Melon and maybe some carrots.

keith3267
Re: Spring Planting in our vegetable garden

Still too cold here. I planted 4 blackberries (Black Satin) and 50 strawberries (Sparkle and Honeyoe) last week. Started tomatoes (Brandywine and Sweet 100) and Artichokes (Green Globe and Empire) in flats. I will direct plant corn (Mirai), Sugar Snap Peas, various squashes, Purple Hull Peas, and cantaloupe when it is time. Might do some Romain Lettuce too.

Edit: the early daffodils are blooming so I'll probably plant the Sugar Snaps during the warm spell expected this weekend. I need to transplant some wild plums about now too.

A. Spruce
Re: Spring Planting in our vegetable garden

Though the weather is much warmer now, it's still a little early to start planting here in the north state. We'll probably go another month or so before "digging in".

Our usual:
Tomatoes, cukes, squash. Occasionally we'll do a melon or pumpkin, sometimes various peppers. We don't have a whole lot of space, and the tomatoes usually take up the majority because we try to produce enough to make Catsup and soups.

dj1
Re: Spring Planting in our vegetable garden

Keith, I've got to go to Tennessee, visit your garden and see.

Spruce, did you plant American Cuke?

I forgot to mention: We planted Ace and Better Boy tomatoes, and in addition, we hope to have new seedlings from last year's Cherry Tomato harvest (We usually get a few plants to re-grow). We love all kinds.

Remember this: "Seed with a tear...harvest with joy".

A. Spruce
Re: Spring Planting in our vegetable garden

We usually do an English and a salad cuke, as for tomatoes, usually an Early Girl, cherry, a couple roma, a couple brandy wine, and Amish paste tomatoes. Not sure why we do Early Girls, since they produce at about the same time as everything else does. The roma and paste tomatoes are good for canning and processing, the others are generally eaten, though do find their way into batches of catsup too.

HoustonRemodeler
Re: Spring Planting in our vegetable garden

I'm jealous. We have soooo much shade from 2 huge trees almost nothing grows.

We do enjoy the savings on air conditioning which we spend on fruits and vegetables.

ordjen
Re: Spring Planting in our vegetable garden

Well, after a hot and very dry summer last year, we set a near record for winter rain here in the Portland, Oregon area. Winter was also quite warm, seldom flirting with freezing. It will be a few weeks before serious planting can be done. We had about 4 dry days where I could at least get out and mow the grass before the rain started again. The soil is absolutely saturated. At least there is lots of snow mass in the Cascades and the rivers will be running this summer and the salmon in the Columbia and its tributaries will be a lot healthier and happier this summer..

dj1
Re: Spring Planting in our vegetable garden

Portland, Oregon rain - so famous.

How do they mange to complete outdoor construction projects on time with so much rain?

keith3267
Re: Spring Planting in our vegetable garden

Spring of last year, tilled 8 of the 10 beds and got 10 trailer loads of horse manure from the stables before they closed down. $10/load. Put on 10 beds 4x22' Two beds were already in Asparagus.

My drip irrigation system. I cut up a hose and added repair ends and a 2 way splitter. The attached soaker hose to bed.

Late summer, I got loads of chipped up wood from the town lot, $10/load. About 6 trailer loads. Put them between the beds in the walkways. End of the season, stuck a fork in it (beds) and pulled back. Did not turn over, just broke the ground and let some of the manure penetrate down into the soil. I wanted to till at this point but I was running out of time and rain was on the way. I covered the beds with a couple inches of leaves

Covered the leaves with some old left over wheat straw.

The new plants arrived a little early so I put the blackberries and strawberries in without tilling. I planted some Asparagus today in gaps where the plants had died. Put out the purple type this time. The rest is Jersey Hybrid. Should not come up till late April or early May.

Plan on tilling a couple of beds tomorrow and plating sugar sap peas. Daffodils are blooming so it is time. Also need to transplant a couple of wild plums.

A. Spruce
Re: Spring Planting in our vegetable garden
dj1 wrote:

Portland, Oregon rain - so famous.

How do they mange to complete outdoor construction projects on time with so much rain?

As with anywhere, you adapt to the local conditions. Sometimes that means getting wet, sometimes that means working in 114* heat, sometimes that's working in arctic conditions. We all have our own "season" for getting things done outside, then hope to God that we don't have to be out there when it's nasty!

keith3267 wrote:

Spring of last year,

Impressive, Keith. That's the kind of thing I grew up with, our small garden was 50'x100', our large garden was about half an acre. We grew just about everything back then and either froze or canned what we needed to make it through the winter. Tons of work that I hated as a kid and now miss greatly as an adult. To be clear, I hated the work, but loved the great food we had year round because of it. Now, I can't think of anything better than to be self sufficient again.

keith3267
Re: Spring Planting in our vegetable garden

Way to windy to till today, maybe tomorrow. I don't grow to put up food, I try to grow just enough to eat fresh out of the garden. The only thing I put up from last year was sweet potatoes, because you only have to dry them outdoors for a few days, then box them up and put them away. They do start to get a little mealy by late spring the next year, but they are good to bake through winter.

We used to can and freeze but we don't anymore. I garden for pleasure and exercise. I do love that first Tomato sandwich made with the first ripe Brandywine tomato in the summer. I usually eat the asparagus raw, right in the garden, same for sugar snap peas.

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