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Trema
spots on interior doors possible mold
Trema

I live in a small town in Southern North Carolina close to the coast. My question - We live a brick house about 45 years old. All around the inside of the house especially the woodwork around the bedroom and closet doors there is brownish yellow spots. I clean them off and they come back some won't wash off. It is even on some clothing especially leather. Whats going on?

photos can be seen on this link.. https://spoteddoors.shutterfly.com/pictures/10#9

dj1
Re: spots on interior doors possible mold
dj1

If it's indeed mold, you may have a moisture problem. Check your relative humidity with a gauge.

Bleach usually clears mold. If you have moisture, a dehumidifier can help.

It could also be something else.

Can you upload some clear pics? post them at a host like photobucket, then give us the link.

Trema
Re: spots on interior doors possible mold
Trema
dj1 wrote:

If it's indeed mold, you may have a moisture problem. Check your relative humidity with a gauge.

Bleach usually clears mold. If you have moisture, a dehumidifier can help.

It could also be something else.

Can you upload some clear pics? post them at a host like photobucket, then give us the link.

try this link - https://spoteddoors.shutterfly.com/pictures/10#9

Fencepost
Re: spots on interior doors possible mold
Fencepost

If you have a severe moisture problem, it can take a long time to get the humidity levels under control.

But first you need to identify and remedy the source of the moisture. If your home is over a crawl space, make sure there's a vapor barrier on the ground underneath, and that the crawl space it properly vented. Make sure there are no roof leaks. Make sure the siding is intact and shedding water properly. Common trouble spots where water can get in are around windows and doors and corner boards.

If you have a finished basement, or your home is build "slab on grade", preventing moisture from transmitting through the concrete is very difficult and very expensive. If you have a basement, the best solution is to waterproof the walls from the OUTSIDE, which means digging down to the footing and sealing the outside of the concrete.

Also make sure that surface water drains AWAY from your home, and gutter downspouts are directed AWAY from your home. You may need to ensure that you have adequate footing drains, and that those drains aren't blocked. The idea is to keep the water away from your foundation walls, which will help keep it out of your basement or crawl space.

Once you've got the source handled, a dehumidifier is a must. It can take a long time to get the indoor humidity under control, because as you're drying out the air, the moisture in the air is being replenished by the moisture that's been absorbed into the building materials. The solid surfaces such as wood and sheetrock can hold a tremendous amount of moisture, more than the air in your home can handle. It takes a long time to draw this excess moisture out.

Sombreuil_mongrel
Re: spots on interior doors possible mold
Sombreuil_mongrel

Mold is most likely, but another possibility is a stain used to finish the wood is bleeding through brought on by humidity and washing the doors.
I would scra-pe the paint off next to a hinge and see if there is a brown finish/stain on the wood. Aniline dye was popular in the 10's onward for getting dark wood tones on cheaper woods, and aniline will bleed through any finish given the right conditions. If you expose an old brown finish, then wipe with alcohol, if the finish and color are dissolved then you probably have aniline dye.
Casey

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