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wcwilkinson
Skylight puzzler
wcwilkinson

I'll start off with words from a different post, since the environment is the same: The roof is the ceiling of my single-story contemporary house (built 1959). The cathedral ceiling is also the roof; there is no attic or space between the inside ceiling and the roof (it isn't a raked ceiling). The ceiling is tongue and groove planks, above which (I presume) is plywood sheathing, to which are attached the shingles (fiberglas, I think). Ceilings are 8' high along outside walls, rising to 12' at the peak. There are no rafters (I said 'joists' previously but 'rafters' is what I mean); the whole thing rests on 5"x15" solid pine beams that run the length of the house (beams are roughly 8' apart horizontally).

This issue is about a skylight: I'd like to add one to a bathroom that has no window. Problem is, I've contact several contractors who install skylights and they figuratively shake their heads. They say they'll get back to me with suggestions/plans but none ever does. I've looked at plans for skylights and they all seem to be made for attic-style roofs or at least for raked roofs, where there is more space between the top of the roof and the ceiling. In my case, I'm guessing that there is probably no more than 3 inches between the top of the roof and the bottom of the ceiling.

I can't imagine that this is a unique problem, so would appreciate ideas and suggestions.

Thanks.

bp21901
Re: Skylight puzzler
bp21901

Maybe I'm too tired, but I can't think of an idea at the moment that would allow you to support the tongue & groove planks on the ceiling. I am assuming these planks are a single plank between the support of the beams that are 8' apart? I believe if you cut into those planks for the skylight opening, you will have to support them around the skylight with some kind of "header" system.

You could get some header ideas engineered and see what would actually look appealing.

Hopefully someone else has a good idea for you.

canuk
Re: Skylight puzzler
canuk

As bp21901 mentioned you would definately need to have framing installed to support the celing/roof once the opening is cut. In your case since this ceiling is an eposed type of construction then this framing will need to match the existing wood work.

Depending on the size .... 2 feet by 4 feet for example ... then framing would need to run perpedicluar to the roof beams ... running the 8 feet on each side of the opening. Then a framing member would need to run between those 2 at the top and bottom of the opening.

Give it some serious thought .... in my opinion skylights can be a pain in the butt especially in a bathroom during cold winters .... condensation .

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