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Aaron
Sizing coffered ceiling grids
Aaron

I'm planning to install a "coffered ceiling" in my dining room similar to the project by John Casey detailed in the Nov/Dec 2013 issue of the magazine. My question relates to the sizing of the grids. Is there some rule of thumb on what looks good? I have a light fixture centered in the room, so an odd number of coffers makes the most sense to center on the fixture. If I do a 3x3 grid I end up with coffers of about 42x50. If I do a 5x5 grid the coffers end up at 23x28. Does anyone have thoughts on this? How large were the coffers in the magazine article? They don't state the room dimensions so I can't work it out.

Thanks,

Aaron Petersen

Sombreuil_mongrel
Re: Sizing coffered ceiling grids
Sombreuil_mongrel

Bear in mind, it doesn't have to be a regular even grid. This was done to fit the room and is used to hide lights to illuminate artwork, so some of the "beams" had to be at specific distances from the walls. I think it looks really good.

Aaron
Re: Sizing coffered ceiling grids
Aaron

Thanks for the pic. I had not thought about uneven spaces. Do you happen to remember any rough dimensions? How big is the room and how big are the coffers?

Sombreuil_mongrel
Re: Sizing coffered ceiling grids
Sombreuil_mongrel

I seem to remember that room was 16x20 or 22. The narrow coffers were 30" The overall drop depth of the trim was about 6 inches. They subsequently got a paperhanger in to put textured glazed paper on the ceiling. It looks amazing. Here's how I put it up; the room had a finished ceiling already, so we only had the joists to attach to; I made the U-shaped blocking units and we screwed them into the joists along carefully measured chalk lines. Then we made up the squares of stepped freeze moldings and put them in as a unit, added the crown molding and perimeter trims last.

Casey

Mastercarpentry
Re: Sizing coffered ceiling grids
Mastercarpentry

I don't think there's a 'design rule of thumb' for this. We've all seen many sizes of coffers. I try to size them with three main things in mind: 1- Alignments with non-movable ceiling stiff like lights over a bar, HVAC diffusers and such. 2- Alignments with high wall features such as doors and windows. 3- Use of the room; am I looking for lots of 'fancy' or to just add some character?

With those three things in mind you'll usually come up with the best size and alignment pattern quickly. I don't like the 'beams' over a doorway- I think a 'space' looks better there. Windows similar but less so. The coffer sizing doesn't have to be uniform; sometimes a larger center or 2-sized layout looks better. What does matter is that it be uniform with all similar interfaces- you don't want a 'beam' over one window to have the window beside it in the middle of a 'space' unless a more important (more visible) interface demands that happen. Offsetting the pattern can look good so long as the smallest 'space' isn't just too narrow though that can work well if it's aligned along 'interest' such as a wall full or paintings or a continuous window. To help visualize your ideas use cardboard strips and push-pins or staples to hold them, then walk in and out every door as well as around every angle of the room where someone may stand as you study it. I like to do that with uncertain customers and it has saved me the grief of a redo more than once!

Phil

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