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dirtball
Silicone Caulk

what no abrasive product will remove silicone caulk from ceramic tile and a bath tub(fiberglass)? I have removed the caulk bead. Now need to remove residue.

A. Spruce
Re: Silicone Caulk

The best thing I've found, no joke, is a white rubber dog chew toy. You can carve the toy to fit your needs, then you simply rub it like an eraser and it will roll up, peel out, and otherwise remove the majority of the silicone and it's residue.

Fencepost
Re: Silicone Caulk

I haven't tried it on silicone but it works on almost everything else: De-Solv-It. The best citrus solvent ever made. Trouble is, it's hard to find and expensive -- about $8 for a 12 oz. bottle. Look for it in hardware stores.

ordjen
Re: Silicone Caulk

Dirtball,

The Ace Hardware chain sells a product called McKanica Silicon Remover. It is a gell which is applied to the old silicon caulk and dissolves it. It is water soluable.

http://www.acehardware.com/sm-mckanica-silicone-caulk-remover-gel-mckanica-silicone-caulk-remover-gel--pi-2151182.html

Blue RidgeParkway
Re: Silicone Caulk
dirtball wrote:

what no abrasive product will remove silicone caulk from ceramic tile and a bath tub(fiberglass)? I have removed the caulk bead. Now need to remove residue.

Since you indicated you have already removed the actual caulk bead I assume you are referring to the oily film residue which prevents new caulk from adhering. If there are still bits of caulk remaining other helpful tools for retrieving caulk from narrow spaces between tile wall and tub or shower pan: A wooden tooth pick, a popcicle stick, a razor blade, a nylon scraping tool, a metal hooked dental crevase tool, an interdental brush tool (pack of a dozen for under 2 dollars - look like minature bottle brushes), a pencil eraser.

For cleaning/priming the "caulk free" zone and preparing to re-caulk, I would first try odorless mineral spirits or lacquer thinner. Washing with a detergent, drying, then alcohol. The oily silicone residue is very difficult to erradicate and will prevent proper adhesion of future caulk (this is the reason I never recommend using actual silicone caulk in a tub or shower area - only mildew resistant "laytex" bath and shower caulk not containing silicone - but may be "siliconized" which means it will remain pliable not dry hard - but avoid a blend or actual "silicone"). Lots of 100% cotton rags, all cotton "cotton balls", "Q-tips" and cosmetic pads. Don't use polyester or other fiber blends of what otherwise "looks" like cotton, and all-paper towels.

Before re-caulking you should address the integrity of the grout sealer.

Fencepost
Re: Silicone Caulk

Just a little pet peeve of mine:

Silicon (without an E) - a silvery metal element used in the manufacture of electronic devices. One of the elements that makes up Silicon Dioxide, better known as beach sand.

Silicone (with an E) - a heat-resistant, rubber-like polymer used as a sealant, elastic, in baking pans, as a foundation for medical implants, and many other uses. Yes, it does contain silicon (according to Wikipedia).

Thanks for listening. And spell it right next time, by Jove!

dirtball
Re: Silicone Caulk

Thanks for the advice. I will try the Ace hardware product first (seems easiest).
Not sure I gcan get the dog toy away without loosing a finger.
As far as spelling, I'm pretty sure we all are talking about the Silicone (with an E) - a heat-resistant, rubber-like polymer used as a sealant, elastic, in baking pans, as a foundation for medical implants, and many other uses. Yes, it does contain silicon (according to Wikipedia). (like it was spelled). And I thougt this was This old House, "not This Old English Teacher"

jboller56
Re: Silicone Caulk

THAT was funny dirtball.

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