72 posts / 0 new
Last post
JLMCDANIEL
Re: "sheetrock" for my barn/shop

As I said, truss uplift should not be a problem in this case anyway because the wall "studs" are attached to the truss with plates so they can't seperate.
Jack

Re: "sheetrock" for my barn/shop

Someone earlier mentions "ventalating" up there....... small windows on each end, long area. Yes, my wife reminds me every time she looks at it that "she had suggested a much larger window in the end".
Wives should be listened to more often, I guess.
Well, I do have a large, whole-house fan that I plan on putting in the south window, I'll have to build a mounting for it since it was made to go over a larger window. I did a great job in a house I used to live in that had NO A/C at all. It sat in an upstairs window and caused a good breeze to come into each lower window.
But I also wonder about all the dust, etc. when not having a window open, or when it's raining. Gee....

Re: "sheetrock" for my barn/shop
JLMCDANIEL wrote:

As I said, truss uplift should not be a problem in this case anyway because the wall "studs" are attached to the truss with plates so they can't seperate.
Jack

I was attempting to use a scrap from one of the trusses where they had cut the lower cord and some other pieces to make room for the stairs. I wanted just the one board. WOW, I could not get that nail plate or whatever it's called out of that board for anything. I ended up cutting it apart. Those babies stick hard!

Blue RidgeParkway
Re: "sheetrock" for my barn/shop
JLMCDANIEL wrote:

Yep, they're called the bottom chords.

I don't think truss lift is going to be a problem because the wall structure is plated rather than nailed An access door to the truss area can be installed in a steel ceiling just like any other ceiling.
Jack

JLMCDANIEL wrote:

As I said, truss uplift should not be a problem in this case anyway because the wall "studs" are attached to the truss with plates so they can't seperate.
Jack

actually the bottom truss chords are under his loft floor and what his garage area steel ceiling is attached to. those "wall studs" are actually webs. they are gambrel room-in-attic or storage trusses.

wind load on the building walls can also cause truss lift. strong backs rather than bracing. open floor to the loft area + open overhead doors below with wind might create a problem too. I wouldn't do anything until created and installed insulated scuttle door system spring or weight and pully lift.

havanagranite
Re: "sheetrock" for my barn/shop

well I suppose if this nice man has unlimited funds lets go ahead and take every precautionary step and recommend him retro fit this garage for seismic activity, and meteorites could be a real hazard. or we might stay in the realm of being realistic

Blue RidgeParkway
Re: "sheetrock" for my barn/shop
havanagranite wrote:

well I suppose if this nice man has unlimited funds lets go ahead and take every precautionary step and recommend him retro fit this garage for seismic activity, and meteorites could be a real hazard. or we might stay in the realm of being realistic

realizing you must not be familiar with storage-in-attic trusses or room-in-attic trusses or pole structures i'll overlook the sarcastic commentary since seismic and horizontal winds are designed for limits when engineered for central iowa to specified loading limits and building and finishing specs.

I posted a sample storage-in-attic gambrel truss drawing example the truss engineering drawing contains the information the original poster seeks.

storage-in trusses often spec'd for 10 psf dead and 20 psf live for that area 24 oc and 3/4 storage floor already loading those trusses. if you explored his web page you'd know the uses he plans for the lower level and has also already loaded those chords. 7'h of 1/2" drywall will also load those verticle webs concentrated loads psf abutted to the storage loft floor could crack or buckle with bottom chord lift. midwest slightly shorter garage size not barn height would be minimum design 90(40) winds.

a room-in-attic spec is usually at least 20 lbs psf dead and 40 psf live for the inside of the truss "room" but would have more than 7'6" raw head room before ceiling finish for a room and the ceiling would have room and loading for two layers of drywall and a perpindicular mounting system. The engineered truss drawings have the loading information in that box which is second to the right at the bottom of the drawing. all notes in the drawing apply. Bill should have his truss drawings and can ask his builder or the engineer who stampled his drawings to point out the loading limitations and to calculate his present applied dead load and if he has storage-in or room-in trusses. built-ins between the trusses beyond the storage-in or room-in area would NOT be outlined since that area would be ZERO PSF dead load. He has only perpindicular purlins and horizontal bracing for the poles. wind load with doors open could create domino effect ground wind gusts and blizzard winds happen.

any doubt you get an engineer to spec the finishing, sign and stamp them with his PE number then your insurance will pay and collect after the engineer if you don't deviate from the loading specifications.

havanagranite
Re: "sheetrock" for my barn/shop
Blue RidgeParkway wrote:

realizing you must not be familiar with storage-in-attic trusses or room-in-attic trusses or pole structures i'll overlook the sarcastic commentary since seismic and horizontal winds are designed for limits when engineered for central iowa to specified loading limits and building and finishing specs.

I posted a sample storage-in-attic gambrel truss drawing example the truss engineering drawing contains the information the original poster seeks.

storage-in trusses often spec'd for 10 psf dead and 20 psf live for that area 24 oc and 3/4 storage floor already loading those trusses. if you explored his web page you'd know the uses he plans for the lower level and has also already loaded those chords. 7'h of 1/2" drywall will also load those verticle webs concentrated loads psf abutted to the storage loft floor could crack or buckle with bottom chord lift. midwest slightly shorter garage size not barn height would be minimum design 90(40) winds.

a room-in-attic spec is usually at least 20 lbs psf dead and 40 psf live for the inside of the truss "room" but would have more than 7'6" raw head room before ceiling finish for a room and the ceiling would have room and loading for two layers of drywall and a perpindicular mounting system. The engineered truss drawings have the loading information in that box which is second to the right at the bottom of the drawing. all notes in the drawing apply. Bill should have his truss drawings and can ask his builder or the engineer who stampled his drawings to point out the loading limitations and to calculate his present applied dead load and if he has storage-in or room-in trusses. built-ins between the trusses beyond the storage-in or room-in area would NOT be outlined since that area would be ZERO PSF dead load. He has only perpindicular purlins and horizontal bracing for the poles. wind load with doors open could create domino effect ground wind gusts and blizzard winds happen.

any doubt you get an engineer to spec the finishing, sign and stamp them with his PE number then your insurance will pay and collect after the engineer if you don't deviate from the loading specifications.

I have many years experience in the construction trades in supervision and owner. while what you say may have merits in certain applications in others it would be both inpractical and overkill. you are talking about a home shop above a garage and you are wanting him to have a structural engineer just to hang drywall. and you need to do more research on uplift and the problems that arise from it. if you had true first hand knowledge of the matter and not just internet google experience you would understand that the problem of uplift isn't at exterior walls where truss and walls are nailed but rather at interior walls where trusses are floated above the wall. and when an area has been stated and you google and find it true you either change what you said or you try to use language that the home owner isn't likely to understand to try to make yourself sound knowledgeable. a good teacher isn't someone who can speak above other's heads but rather someone who can break down something complicated into simple language so anyone can understand. the problem arises when the person speaking doesn't understand the matter fully themselves even though they think they do. in such cases they have no choice but to try to use 5 dollar words but are quickly showen that they don't have an understanding by anyone who has true experience in that particular trade. I have tried to keep silent on this post but I really don't want Bill to be mislead and spend money or worry about areas that there is no need to.

Bill I am sorry from distracting from your post but please be assured that your structure is safe and sound and your options are only limited by the look you desire and what you need to do with the space.

Blue RidgeParkway
Re: "sheetrock" for my barn/shop
havanagranite wrote:

you don't have to worry about expansion joints or load weight due to your drywall. you are fine on all that. the garage unit you bought is designed with the loft to be finished in the way you are going about doing it. drywall is hung in metal buildings everyday with out adverse consequences. here is a quote from the national gypsum company on spec. requirements regarding expansion joints in ceilings.

Control joints are required in ceilings to limit areas to 2,500 square feet. Additionally, control joints should be installed in ceilings to limit dimensions in either direction to 50 feet. Control joints should be installed where ceiling framing or furring changes direction.

[COLOR=black]the previous poster while well intentioned tends to be extremely overly cautious beyond what specs. or any other requirements demand.

[/COLOR]

he originally proposed drywalling ceiling and walls of the room-in-attic truss or storage-in-attic truss loft.

you make statements that he is all fine on the loading for drywall. you have no way of knowing if these were storage-in or room-in-attic gambrel trusses so how can you make such a statement, especially when Bill's linked site says the raw ceiling height was 7'5' and his planned finished ceiling was 7' and that he insulated the bottom chords all the way to the outside wall and finished the lower chord lower level all the way to the outside wall with unvented steel. fact is you don't and you're making generalized statements without knowledge or access to the truss specifications or knowing the loading. heck several of you thought the bottom chord was above his loft space.

We actually built a barn similar to his. difference being we had swing doors 14' both sides and have loft doors and have more structural strength before we sided it ours is also larger and just a little bit taller. drywall hanger and stone countertop fabricator skills aside i seriously doubt you have any experience with agricultural post structures exceeding 25 feet.

kentvw
Re: "sheetrock" for my barn/shop

Fun isn't it? Trying to help folks all the while trying to deconstruct "lesliebabble".

JLMCDANIEL
Re: "sheetrock" for my barn/shop
Blue RidgeParkway wrote:

those "wall studs" are actually webs.

Yes, I know they are webs. I used the quote marks on the studs for a simplification of descriptive use. I never said that there would be no truss uplift, I simply pointed out the usual problem of wall/ceiling separation would not be a problem in this case. It would appear that the building was designed by a professional and code, stress, load, etc was taken in to account and I felt no need to overly complicate the discussion.
Jack

Pages

Sponsored Stories

TV Listings

Find TV listings for This Old House and Ask This Old House in your area.