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GregInGA
Securing baseboard molding with liquid nails
GregInGA

I am putting some baseboard molding on my wall and because the drywall is not perfectly flat on the wall (I won't get into the reason) there is a wider gap in some spots

If I use liquid nails (or something similar) and brace the molding against the drywall while it dries, will the molding pull away. The option is too use some backer material.

Your ideas are appreciated

function
Re: Securing baseboard molding with liquid nails
function

I spoke with a custom homebuilder once who told me he wont pay his guys for the hours they have worked for the day if he walks in and sees them attaching moulding without glue as well as fasteners. Others may have differing opinions.

A. Spruce
Re: Securing baseboard molding with liquid nails
A. Spruce

IMHO, glue should never be used on baseboards unless absolutely necessary. Instead, make sure that fasteners are being driven into wall framing and not just drywall. For minor gaps such as what you have pictured, caulk and paint them, as this will look better in most cases than wavy baseboard that is forced to follow uneven walls. IMHO, painted base should always be caulked anyway to create a seamless transition between the wall and base.

dj1
Re: Securing baseboard molding with liquid nails
dj1

I usually use finish nails and caulking. You don't need a ton of nails, because of what you described in your posting about the walls being uneven. Just attach the baseboard as straight as it can be, the caulking will fill in the top.

Mastercarpentry
Re: Securing baseboard molding with liquid nails
Mastercarpentry

A wavy line at the floor stands out and looks awful. If needed put some narrow shimming there then nail the top of the baseboard tight to the studs where any waviness will be far less noticeable. Sometimes you have to rely on glue to do things, but it's only going to hold as good as what it's attached to- in this case the paper face of the drywall- which ain't much when you think about it. Plus if you glue the base and it ever needs to be removed (repairs or flooring upgrades) you'll rip the paper face of the sheetrock off removing it leaving you with only it's crumbly core to reattach to.

I ain't trying to take shortcuts or 'get out of doing work' not gluing baseboard- I'm simply smart enough to look father down the road and see where it's actually a very bad idea!

Phil

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