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ebronson19
Sagging Midbeam trouble in old farm house

Hi! We are looking to purchase a renovated 2 story farm house, however we noticed the first floor has large dips in the floor and uneven spots (not so much waves as larger dips on either side of where the midbeam is). In the basement we saw the midbeam is undersized for the home and currently has two lally columns in place under it (but they have not been adjusted). The midbeam is about 8x8 and spans 25 feet. The joists supporting the floor were simply nailed into the midbeam and have loosened and pulled away from the midbeam. Is it possible to fix this issue by simply raising the midbeam, adding braces to connect it to the joists? ie. once adjusted, are the lally columns enough to hold the midbeam or does an additional beam (such as a steel i-beam) need to be added? Any insight on correcting midbeam troubles would be greatly appreciated. Thanks!

Timothy Miller
Re: Sagging Midbeam trouble in old farm house

Consider a structural engine consultation for inspection and report as to what and where to correct the issues. Verbal report is less $$$

ebronson19
Re: Sagging Midbeam trouble in old farm house

We will have an inspection done if we decide to buy. Right now, we are thinking about submitting an offer but just want to know if the problem is fixable (and how labor intensive the fix is) before we submit an offer. We'd like to hear from someone who has dealt with midbeam troubles before. Thanks.

Timothy Miller
Re: Sagging Midbeam trouble in old farm house

Howdy consider in offer having owner pay for structural enginer report to determine repairs needed and bid the cost and reduce the sales price. Better before then after you own it....

canuk
Re: Sagging Midbeam trouble in old farm house
ebronson19 wrote:

Hi! We are looking to purchase a renovated 2 story farm house, however we noticed the first floor has large dips in the floor and uneven spots (not so much waves as larger dips on either side of where the midbeam is). In the basement we saw the midbeam is undersized for the home and currently has two lally columns in place under it (but they have not been adjusted). The midbeam is about 8x8 and spans 25 feet. The joists supporting the floor were simply nailed into the midbeam and have loosened and pulled away from the midbeam. Is it possible to fix this issue by simply raising the midbeam, adding braces to connect it to the joists? ie. once adjusted, are the lally columns enough to hold the midbeam or does an additional beam (such as a steel i-beam) need to be added? Any insight on correcting midbeam troubles would be greatly appreciated. Thanks!

It's hard to say what's what sight unseen.
You may be looking at a couple thousand or a few thousand $$$$ --- really depends The existing 8x8 may or may not be sound as it once was. The mention of support columns --- are they carring point loads from above --- depends on what they sit on --- are they on footings or simply resting on the basement floor --- are they spaced properly ?

The joist connections will definately need to be properly secured.
Then and again levelling the main beam and joists should be considered to be done which means there will be consequential damage with cracking of walls and ceilings from moving the floor /support structure.

The only way to say for sure is an appraisal from a certified structural engineer.

The thing that stands out was the mention of this being a renovated home. I would approach this place with reservation if it was renovated properly there shouldn't be the issues you pointed out --- theses are not minor ones.
To be honest you might want to check the local municipal building department for permits issued and inspected for those renovations before placing any offers. Something tells me the renovations may not been all that well done if you noticed these issues --- what else is lurking ?

And yes --- make sure this place is throughly inspected.

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