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robert m
Re: Rooftop antenna and gas main

i posted a couple of examples on another post on this subject and i was hoping it would go to all the posts on this subject on what can happen when this is done. please read them and it will explain my point.

Lloyd wrote:

Robert

I dont think anyone was suggesting useing the gas main as an electrode. The question, I beleive, was one of NEC requirements for distance of electrodes from gas lines. Then we hijacked the thread to express our proffessional opinion of an instalation we saw on a recent show.

Which part of this conversation do you think is above the level of the master electricians, engineers, and a combined century or so of experience and only answerable by a gas technician? Please, be more specific.

side note, I dont think dissapateing a lightning strike is the purpose of the ground on the antenna.

Re: Rooftop antenna and gas main

Once again Robert noone was suggesting using the gas line as an electrode, give us a little more credit

Jack

JLMCDANIEL wrote:

Lloyd,
Even if they paid more, would you be able to look a customer in the eye and tell them they will save 25% or more on their electricity.
Jack

No, absolutely not. However I do get a lot of calls to install them from the snake oil salesman, when I tell them that there customer will be need to sign a statement saying They understand I dont warrant the claims of MFG they usually dont give me the work, well that and the 225 I want to install them. There are actually several electrical contractors around here that DO actually sell them tho, for more than $1000. They should know better. It seems to me that it makes a clear statement about what they think about there customers. I'll stop there so I dont go into another rant.

I'll note that thre ARE a handfull of comercial applications that can benefit from these devices tho they dont warrant the cost. There may also be some use for them in the near future as line conditioners for residential grid tie pv systems.

robert m
Re: Rooftop antenna and gas main
JLMCDANIEL wrote:

Unless you read the posts, you shouldn't criticize. No one suggested or implied grounding to the gas line or the meter. The discussion was how far from the meter the GEC should be and whether or not the grounding was done to code.

Even professionals make mistakes, I can remember a few years back when some natural gas techs where digging up a gas line and cut into an underground main and cut the power to a whole subdivision. That didn't supply any further information about the subject at hand either.

Your point "YOU MUST CALL DIG SAFE ITS FEDERAL AND STATE LAW!!! " is valid. Had you complain about the gas line and other underground utilities not being marked before driving the GEC you would have been in better standing.

By the way gas lines to a residence are bonded. The water lines are bonded, the furnace is bonded and both have mechanical connections to the gas line. I guess if you are going to give electrical advice you should have some knowledge of the subject.
Jack

gas lines to a residence are not bonded. bonding starts on the homeowners pipes after the the gas meter. i should have been more specific (my right hand is broken so typing is a chore)

robert m
Re: Rooftop antenna and gas main
robert m wrote:

gas lines to a residence are not bonded. bonding starts on the homeowners pipes after the the gas meter. i should have been more specific (my right hand is broken so typing is a chore)

read my post and you will understand the point im trying to make.

JLMCDANIEL
Re: Rooftop antenna and gas main
robert m wrote:

gas lines to a residence are not bonded. bonding starts on the homeowners pipes after the the gas meter. i should have been more specific (my right hand is broken so typing is a chore)

Metal gas line mechanically connected to metal meter mechanically connected to lines in house mechanically connected to bonded WH and bonded furnace. Where is the insulated break in the bonding? The gas line is bonded and grounded(it's buried). You are correct that lightening grounds should not use a gas line as a GEC you are, however, wrong if you believe that the lines are not bonded or grounded.

Jack

NEC
Re: Rooftop antenna and gas main

Bonding and grounding are terms few understand.

A. Spruce
Re: Rooftop antenna and gas main
NEC wrote:

Bonding and grounding are terms few understand.

Bonding is the insurance you need before falling off a ladder and grounding yourself. :D

canuk
Re: Rooftop antenna and gas main

Bonding with you guys keeps me grounded. ;):D

JLMCDANIEL
Re: Rooftop antenna and gas main
NEC wrote:

Bonding and grounding are terms few understand.

It would appear that electrical continuity is also a foreign concept to some.
Jack

A. Spruce
Re: Rooftop antenna and gas main
JLMCDANIEL wrote:

It would appear that electrical continuity is also a foreign concept to some.
Jack

Electrical Continuity
n. pl. electrical con·ti·nu·i·ties

The state or quality of a group of sparkies to get along.

:p;)

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