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A. Spruce
Roofing Fasteners
A. Spruce

The recent thread on valley replacement, which has lead to a debate on valley construction, has brought up something that I'm curious about amongst my fellow nail benders. I'd like to take a poll on your preference of roofing staples vs roofing nails, unfortunately, this forum doesn't utilize a poll taking feature, so y'all gonna have to get interactive! :p

I guess the easiest way to do this will be to ask a series of questions, you may quote this post then answer after each line item. Thanks for you input and thoughts.

1 - What are your thoughts and preferences concerning roofing staples vs roofing nails?

2 - Regardless of which you prefer, why do you like this type of fastener?

3 - If you prefer nails, do you prefer hand or pneumatic fasteners, and why?

I'll offer my thoughts to get things rolling

1 - What are your thoughts and preferences concerning roofing staples vs roofing nails?
Nails, definitely nails

2 - Regardless of which you prefer, why do you like this type of fastener?
[COLOR=#800000]From my experience, nails are far superior to staples because they simply hold better due to their large head surface, even when not driven perfectly, they hold better. Staples are too easily and, more often than not, over driven, that is to say, driven too deep, cutting the shingle and eliminating their holding power, much less the fact that they have less surface area in contact with the shingle and that it is a "knife edge" that cuts when force is applied, not a large pad (nail head ) that resists pulling through.[/COLOR]

3 - If you prefer nails, do you prefer hand or pneumatic fasteners, and why?
Ideally, hand driven, because it is easier to control a perfectly driven nail for optimal holding power, however, since production is a direct factor in minimizing cost to consumers and maximizing profits to contractors, this necessitates pneumatic nailing. In my experience, it takes very little effort to use a pneumatic nailer properly, resulting in most nails being set to the right depth and angle without sacrificing production speed.

dj1
Re: Roofing Fasteners
dj1

1. For the most popular shingles, the 30 year architectural, I use 1-1/4" roofing nails. My area is a high wind zone and staples will fail prematurely. Any homeowner who lets his roofer use staples unknowingly, is being short changed.

2. The primary reason is the holding power of roofing nails as opposed to staples. GAF and other shingle companies recommend nails.

3. Hand nailed is better than a nail gun. Volume roofers prefer nail guns, which allow them to finish any roofing job faster. It's up to the homeowner to insist on nails.

Sombreuil_mongrel
Re: Roofing Fasteners
Sombreuil_mongrel

I never tried a stapler for shingles. A t-50 for tarpaper, you bet!
I only used a coil roofing nailer for a few jobs, it was supplied by the GC; he insisted we only do 3 nails per shingle to save 25% on the nails, which are bloody expensive. At least hand-nailing you know for sure that the nail went in the plywood and not in a seam. You get pretty good feeding yourself nails and slamming them in with one stroke. But nowhere near as fast as production work with one guy feeding the shingle and the other guy with the gun.
ps, we did either woven or cut valleys, depending on what was requested. I liked the cut valleys, it's like you run the main roof shingles up the opposite side as far as practicable, then overlay the dormer /gable shingles, snap a chalk line down the valley and cut away the excess. Grace Ice & water shield underneath any way we did it.
Casey

HoustonRemodeler
Re: Roofing Fasteners
HoustonRemodeler

Here in hurricane alley, I don't think staples are allowed.

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