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billhaj
replacing windows that have weights
billhaj

What is the best way to replace older weighted windows? Should replacement windows be used, or new construction windows with the nail on fins?

A. Spruce
Re: replacing windows that have weights
A. Spruce

Your choice and it will depend on what you want the finished product to look like. If you don't care about what the house looks like after the fact, then retrofit windows will be the cheapest and easiest way to go. If you want/need to maintain the aesthetic integrity of the house, then new construction windows would be the way to go.

One thing worth mentioning is that sash windows will not be a "standard" size when it comes time to order up new windows of either type, which will increase your costs a bit with custom made windows.

HoustonRemodeler
Re: replacing windows that have weights
HoustonRemodeler

Normally we use 'replacement' aka finless winders in this application.

Cut the ropes, pull out the trim holding the inner winder, remove inner winder, remove the stock wood between the two winders (normally dado'ed in) remove outer winder, install new winder, caulk into place, paint.

ordjen
Re: replacing windows that have weights
ordjen

I recently ran across this website: www.starcraftcustombuilders.com/windows.htm#.VSi485dvuZF

If the author is correct, it confirms my thoughts that from a strictly energy efficiency viewpoint, replacement windows compared to simply repairing and upgrading older wooden windows, is not actually a smart move. The payback period for new windows is many, many years! Read the article and give your thoughts.

Mastercarpentry
Re: replacing windows that have weights
Mastercarpentry

I've read that before but I still feel that for most folks, replacement windows are the better idea. I have several reasons for this:

Those of us who like maintaining wood windows won't be asking the question. Those who don't maintain wood windows are better off with low-maintenance ones.

Much of the energy savings involved with replacements is due as much to better caulking/sealing as the windows themselves, but by the time you repair, weatherstrip, caulk and paint a wood window you can install several replacements. Time is money!

Most people want double-glazing these days and buyers are willing to pay more when they see it.

With most homes, saving the originality of the design isn't much needed; often folks want to change those details for something more modern anyway.

Rare does the properly-installed vinyl window become problematic in operation; rare is the wood window which doesn't.

So there's more to it than just energy efficiency and pay-back on investment. What the homeowner wants will weight their decision one way or the other rendering the question of payback and efficiency less valuable to them. I won't destroy a historical structure by installing vinyl windows but then again I'm almost never asked to do that; those who own such homes almost always demand following the originality of the design. Either way if the job is done correctly with decent-quality windows, the homeowner will be happy. Anything less is trouble, and that's where the usual window troubles occur. Right or wrong, better or not- vinyl windows are the trend and that doesn't look like it's going to ever change.

Phil

Gord
Re: replacing windows that have weights
Gord
Mastercarpentry wrote:

With most homes, saving the originality of the design isn't much needed; often folks want to change those details for something more modern anyway.

Rare does the properly-installed vinyl window become problematic in operation; rare is the wood window which doesn't.

Right or wrong, better or not- vinyl windows are the trend and that doesn't look like it's going to ever change.
Phil

I remember watching This Old House many years ago, when they repaired problems instead of replacing them. And Norm was always reproducing something he found in an antique shop.
Seems things have changed through the years.

Here in New England, many folks are still trying to save the originality of the design.

I've seen vinyl windows with rope going around the edges to keep drafts out. Most likely poor installations. I've also seen vinyl windows that were supposed to tilt in so easily to clean the exterior of the window; yet many homeowners are unable to work the devices necessary to actually do so. Looked great when the salesman did it.

I also remember when Pressure Treated lumber came along. That was thought of as a trend not likely to ever change. Now it's difficult to dispose of, when it needs to be replaced with the new and better trendy material.

Properly taken care of, wooden windows can last a very long time. And with the modern weather stripping available today, they can also be made quite efficient.

Fencepost
Re: replacing windows that have weights
Fencepost
HoustonRemodeler wrote:

Normally we use 'replacement' aka finless winders in this application.

Cut the ropes, pull out the trim holding the inner winder, remove inner winder, remove the stock wood between the two winders (normally dado'ed in) remove outer winder, install new winder, caulk into place, paint.

One more step: remove the interior casing (trim that's flat on the wall), remove the sash weights, caulk the joints inside, stuff the cavity with insulation, and cover it back up. Paint to taste.

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