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multiphrenic
Replacing shower enclosure
multiphrenic

Hi!

First time poster..we have a house from the late '20s and are removing the tub/shower liner that the previous owner put in.

The plan is to install tiles, using kerdi-board. The old installation was leaky, the drywall underneath ended up moldy, and water made it to our ceiling in the kitchen because of the poor waterproofing.

The old drywall was not a problem but the upper half is a different beast. What's the best way to remove the concrete that covers the upper half of the shower? Some of it is behind lathe, the rest seems to have nothing holding it in place. Right now I'm just using a crowbar, it works okay but there might be a better way.

Do I need to preserve the lathe too?

(Can't seem to insert images)

http://i.imgur.com/EUy7q1i.jpg

http://i.imgur.com/acbukdA.jpg

Jack
Re: Replacing shower enclosure
Jack

Not to sure from the pictures but it may be that you have rock lath. Hammer and crow bar is probably the best solution. To get the best job, I would say remove the lath and all to get an even flat finished job.

Jack

dj1
Re: Replacing shower enclosure
dj1

Time to bring out the big 10 lb sledge hammer. Pound on the wall, it won't stay up for too long. Then pull all fasteners with a wrecking bar.

A. Spruce
Re: Replacing shower enclosure
A. Spruce

Time to go to bare studs and start over.

Removing lath and plaster is more about brute force than finesse, so crowbar, hammer, whatever it takes to do the job. Usually, it's easier to beat the plaster with a hammer, knocking it free of the lath, once the plaster is off, you then go after the lath with a crowbar or hammer claw.

One word of caution! Make sure that any pictures, decorations, light fixtures, etc., are removed from the other side of any shared walls. The amount of beating and prying it's going to take will flex and vibrate that wall like the dickens, and anything hanging upon it will surely end up on the floor and likely broken.

Additional advice, wear long sleeves/protective clothing, safety glasses, gloves, and a good quality dust mask. Use 5-gallon buckets or a Brute garbage can to remove the debris. It's too heavy and sharp to be put into garbage bags, even the "contractor" grade, which are a thicker mil than the standard. If you must bag it, be careful not to load more than either the bag or you can handle safely.

Once the walls are cleaned, inspect the framing and surrounding areas for further damage, replace as necessary.

keith3267
Re: Replacing shower enclosure
keith3267

A.Spruce brings up a good point. Beating the plaster loose on one side of the wall also beats it loose on the other side. You can punch a hole in the plaster between the studs with a regular claw hammer, stick a wrecking bar through the hole, hook the lath and plaster from the inside and pull.

Or you could mark your studs, get a cutting disk for a skill saw or grinder and cut through the lath and plaster on either side of the studs and remove it, then just pry the rest off of the studs. Set the depth of the cutting disk to just below the lath and plaster so you don't accidently cut into any wires or pipes.

A. Spruce
Re: Replacing shower enclosure
A. Spruce
keith3267 wrote:

A.Spruce brings up a good point. Beating the plaster loose on one side of the wall also beats it loose on the other side. You can punch a hole in the plaster between the studs with a regular claw hammer, stick a wrecking bar through the hole, hook the lath and plaster from the inside and pull.

Or you could mark your studs, get a cutting disk for a skill saw or grinder and cut through the lath and plaster on either side of the studs and remove it, then just pry the rest off of the studs. Set the depth of the cutting disk to just below the lath and plaster so you don't accidently cut into any wires or pipes.

Ah, good point, you're right, cracks and damage will occur on the opposite side from the beating and prying.

Instead of a cutting wheel, which is very dusty/dirty, I'd opt for a sawzall and a good supply of "wood with nails" blades. Keep the saw at a good rake angle to minimized vibration and banging.

multiphrenic
Re: Replacing shower enclosure
multiphrenic

thanks for the advice! we managed to clean out everything, the lathe, drywall, rock board, and mesh. also found a junction box that was not closed off, which is really nice to see considering how waterproof the whole setup was...

here it is all cleaned up. it looks like i will need to strap some 1x2s to the studs since the air vent on the right protrudes just a bit.

http://i.imgur.com/WCiOO67.jpg

here is the outlet. i know it's live because the light switch is on the other side of this wall. photo isn't great but this is the same wall as the water supply for the shower.

http://i.imgur.com/E4Vf2CQ.jpg

and here's my new dilemma of the day. how can i fix this vent situation? i'm installing a new fan but stuck on the duct work. the previous owner stretched the meaning of creativity with this one...

http://i.imgur.com/4iXyqQh.jpg

i know i need to vent up that hole, but i'm not able to reach in far enough secure the duct to whatever surrounds the hole.

here's how the PO "solved" that problem

http://i.imgur.com/FHV6F2z.jpg
http://i.imgur.com/dAcGAyL.jpg

hard to believe we had moisture problems in the bathroom.

Sombreuil_mongrel
Re: Replacing shower enclosure
Sombreuil_mongrel

The wire mesh in the corner is also going to be in the wall/ceiling corner. It is problematic to deal with that stuff. It'll cut you. Yes, that is rocklath with plaster finish, and it is probably not savable. Once you get it gutted to framing, you will need to shim the studs up level to the tub flange, apply waterproofing (6mil plastic) and then use Durock or similar for new tile backer. You could also use Kerdi-board and perhaps skip the shimming(?) that product comes in different thicknesses, and you would not need any vapor barrier behind it.
Casey

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