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4square
Replacing bevel clap board siding
4square

I have just moved an exterior window and replaced a door with a window for a remodel project but, I made the mistake of not getting the siding first. I thought would just have to go down to lowes or menards and special order it but they only seem to have 6" and I need 4" . The small lumber yard are closed today so I have been looking around the Internet and it looks like most of the places require an order that is much larger than I need which is about 200 linear feet.

Is it possible to use the 6" and have it match up with the 4" ? There would be more overlap but would that cause the wood to not match up evenly. If the viewable area needs to be 2.5 inches than as long both boards have the same thickness in that viewable area would there be any issues?

A. Spruce
Re: Replacing bevel clap board siding
A. Spruce

Take the time to find the correct size, even if it means using something temporary such as plywood.

The job will also look better if you can break the running bonds, meaning if you're filling in a door and ONLY fill in the door, you're going to have the silhouette of the door remain in your joints. If you install random longer pieces across the opening, breaking up the joints, then the patch will be virtually unnoticeable.

4square
Re: Replacing bevel clap board siding
4square

I also moved a small window a couple of feet closer to the new window. Looks like an Inverted L shape.

A. Spruce
Re: Replacing bevel clap board siding
A. Spruce

Same theory applies, make most of your patch lengths random and it will vanish completely once done. Just fill in the hole and it will be an eye sore until someone fixes it properly.

Sombreuil_mongrel
Re: Replacing bevel clap board siding
Sombreuil_mongrel

Rip them down with a saw; take the excess off the thin edge. If the butt joints don't look good new/old, shim the old or take a belt sander to the new (as you install each course).
Casey

A. Spruce
Re: Replacing bevel clap board siding
A. Spruce
Sombreuil_mongrel wrote:

Rip them down with a saw; take the excess off the thin edge. If the butt joints don't look good new/old, shim the old or take a belt sander to the new (as you install each course).
Casey

This isn't something I'd recommend to a novice. Can it be done, sure, but it can also go very wrong in a hurry.

Mastercarpentry
Re: Replacing bevel clap board siding
Mastercarpentry

I say rip them down too, but I would compare the bottom edge thickness first- if the new is too thick to match up first rip that edge to where the thickness matches, then rip the thin edge to the correct height. A table saw will make this easy and simple but with care to keep the lines straight a skilsaw will work too. You may have to adjust the bottom cut slightly for angle. Some tapered siding has a front and back with the bottom truly square to only the back; you cut that from the back on a 90. Some has no front or back and with that you need a degree or three to make the best match.

If you're not sure go buy one stick and play with it to see whether you can get a match you'll be happy with. And yes, do re-stagger the ends on the existing siding so there will be proper offset. Do the housewrap, backprime the new wood, then caulk, prime, and paint as needed when you are done and only you will know it wasn't always like it is now.

Phil

Sombreuil_mongrel
Re: Replacing bevel clap board siding
Sombreuil_mongrel
A. Spruce wrote:

This isn't something I'd recommend to a novice. Can it be done, sure, but it can also go very wrong in a hurry.

I didn't mean to resaw/re-bevel them, just rip for the correct width. Yipes, resawing would be a hairy rip. Actually, one could make a sled to hold them at the proper position to run through a planer, assuming one had a planer.
Casey

A. Spruce
Re: Replacing bevel clap board siding
A. Spruce
Sombreuil_mongrel wrote:

I didn't mean to resaw/re-bevel them, just rip for the correct width. Yipes, resawing would be a hairy rip. Actually, one could make a sled to hold them at the proper position to run through a planer, assuming one had a planer.
Casey

Now you're just getting super crazy! :p

I was referring to going after it with a belt sander. A board laying on a bench is hard enough to get even with a belt sander, let alone nailing it to a wall and trying to feather it into other materials. Again, not impossible, just not something I'd recommend to a novice.

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