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househelper
Replace Galvanized Iron Pipes

What would you replace galvanized iron pipes with? I had a leak in bathroom. I turned off the shut off valve but it leaked. So I had to turn off the water in the whole house. I bought a new valve and brass connectors. I am about to either purchase new iron pipes or something else. I will ask the hardware store what he recommends.

I opened plaster behind flushometer and found:

Then I hacksawed the pipe next to connector and removed the rest of pipe by unscrewing it.

I am wondering whether I should use brass pipes or copper pipes or plastic pipes.

MLBSF
Re: Replace Galvanized Iron Pipes

depending on your availability of tools, my number 1 choice would be pex. they make copper fittings that will screw into the existing galvi pipe then it's pex from there on, ony problem is that it's not cost effective to purchase the crimping tools. however, i plumbed my entire house with pex, water supply to every fixture in the house in about 6-8 hours. the second choice would be copper, same as above, they make fittings that will go into galvi then it's soddering the connections to your fixtures and the soddering equipment you need to do so would be less than $75 as opposed to several hundred for the pex tool set. if i did my entire house in copper, i would have been looking at at least 2 days minimum. definitely don't go with galvi, it's just a new problem waiting to happen.

jboller56
Re: Replace Galvanized Iron Pipes

I agree with the above. I had a siimiliar situation in my bahtroom and ended up ripping everything out. Go back as far as you can to get as much galv. out. You probably could see all the rust build up. Go at it and good luck!

Fencepost
Re: Replace Galvanized Iron Pipes

When you go to join the old pipes to the new pipes, I recommend running a threading die on the existing pipe to clean up the threads. If you do this, you're less likely to have a leak at that joint.

househelper
How do you connect copper to threaded pipes?

Could anyone tell me how to connect copper pipe to the threaded pipes I already have? I need more specifics on what I need to purchase and how to put it together. Thanks for input.

JLMCDANIEL
Re: Replace Galvanized Iron Pipes

It's called a NPT to copper adapter
You'll need to know the size of the pipe and the size of the copper you are going to use.
Jack

hippified
Re: Replace Galvanized Iron Pipes

when you join the copper to the galvanized pipe, whether you end up using pex or copper make sure you use a dielectric union. attaching copper straight to galvanized will produce an electrical reaction that will corrode the connection and cause failure over time. the are available at any hardware store and are absolutely essential for joining two dissimilar metals like copper and galvanized.

Fencepost
Re: Replace Galvanized Iron Pipes

I'm in agreement with hippified.

househelper
Re: Joining Copper and Gal Iron Pipes

I joined the gal iron pipe to a brass valve and the copper pipe to the other end. Would you still consider it necessary to put a dielectric from the gal iron to the brass valve.
If I had joined the gal iron to copper I would certainly agree to use a dielectric which I already purchased, but I thought it did not matter if I put brass in-between the two pipes.

What do you think?
Moreover, I am thinking of replacing the branch pipe (gal iron) leading to the basement main distribution pipe because the branch pipe is corroded and will break in time. I am waiting until I have enough funds to do something about it. But I am thinking of somehow cutting it out piece by piece if need be to remove it from wall. Then I can put a copper pipe 1" in corner going down to basement and joining that with a dielectric to the gal iron pipe in basement.

I would welcome any suggestions or criticism of my intended project.

Fencepost
Re: Joining Copper and Gal Iron Pipes
househelper wrote:

I joined the gal iron pipe to a brass valve and the copper pipe to the other end. Would you still consider it necessary to put a dielectric from the gal iron to the brass valve.
If I had joined the gal iron to copper I would certainly agree to use a dielectric which I already purchased, but I thought it did not matter if I put brass in-between the two pipes.

What do you think?

You still need a dielectric union. You need to break the electrical connection between the copper and the galvanized.

"Waitaminit, what do you mean electrical, this is plumbing" you ask? When you have dissimilar metals such as zinc* and copper in an acid or alkaline solution, there is a voltage potential between them. In effect, you have created a battery. If there is an electrically conductive path between the two metals, there will be an electrical current flowing from one metal to the other through the conductor, in this case your brass valve. Over time, one of the metals will be dissolved and deposited onto the other metal through the water in a process called electrolysis. Eventually, the metal that is being dissolved will develop a leak. *Zinc being the coating on galvanized steel pipe

If the water has a neutral pH (pH=7), you shouldn't experience any electrolysis. However, most water supplies will be slightly acidic or slightly alkaline. Extremely acidic or alkaline water supplies will be even more susceptible to electrolysis.

The dielectric union contains a plastic bushing that effectively breaks the electrical connection.

Quote:

Moreover, I am thinking of replacing the branch pipe (gal iron) leading to the basement main distribution pipe because the branch pipe is corroded and will break in time. I am waiting until I have enough funds to do something about it. But I am thinking of somehow cutting it out piece by piece if need be to remove it from wall. Then I can put a copper pipe 1" in corner going down to basement and joining that with a dielectric to the gal iron pipe in basement.

I would welcome any suggestions or criticism of my intended project.

A reciprocating saw (aka "Sawzall") fitted with a metal-cutting blade makes quick work of removing galvanized pipe.

Use a spray bottle (like Windex comes in) to spritz water on wood framing where you will be soldering, to reduce the risk of fire. Old wood is often very dry and can catch fire easily. Keep a fire extinguisher handy, and monitor the area for a while after you're done.

Benedlr
Re: Replace Galvanized Iron Pipes

Although more expensive than crimp connectors I have found Sharkbite connectors to be very handy to make connections to cut off pipe. They just push on and are removable. You'll still need a dilectic fitting as they are brass. PEX is a great way to go in replacing pipe. It's economical and very forgiving when making bends and fishing through walls.

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