Home>Discussions>BATHROOMS>Repairing several bathroom problems
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HoustonRemodeler
Re: Repairing several bathroom problems

Welcome,

You'll fare better over at the John Bridge Tile Forum where you can start your own thread, post pictures and get advice specific to your project.

I suspect you have the beginning to middle stages of water penetration. Since this is a condo, I wouldn't touch this without a complete re-do, as there would be no way to guarantee success without knowing how the initial waterproofing was done.

Tile + grout + sealant + cement board is NOT waterproof (as you already found out)

A. Spruce
Re: Repairing several bathroom problems

Without seeing the damage firsthand, it is tough to assess just how bad it is, however, your description does sound like a total redo.

1 - If there are grout issues with the tile, then water is undoubtedly getting behind the tile - not good. Knock on the individual tiles and check if there is a hollow sound, if so, bad news, total replacement time, especially if tile is glued directly to the drywall.

2 - Damage on the outside of the enclosure indicates lack of sealant along door/wall. If it's just the paint that has bubbled and let go, no problem, prep and repaint, if the paper on the drywall has been damage, or the wallboard is crumbling, then the damaged wall will have to be removed and patched back together.

3 - Corrosion at bottom edge of tub, hard to say, could just be from the leaking door and surface damage. If the floor is swollen or has a hollow knock to it, then it's time to pull the flooring and assess the damage.

4 - Damage behind sink, drywall replacement as necessary.

dj1
Re: Repairing several bathroom problems

Landlords always look for ways to save on upgrades/repairs in their rental units and still be able to rent them quickly.
But always stand back and ask your self this: Would I pay this much rent for this home? By doing so, you put yourself in the tenants' shoes, and see things the way they see them.

My approach is: always make the home as perfect as you can, subject to your budget. Never leave things undone that might lead to bigger damages.

Fix the bathroom like spruce recommended, and see how fast the place gets rented.

dpal
Re: Repairing several bathroom problems

***, how reassuring to get all of your input; I really appreciate all of your comments and how specific they were even though I couldn't attach images ( I'm new and still need to learn how to do that). And, yes; since I need to make these repairs, I want to make sure I do what is necessary and that it be done correctly this time.
Again, thanks so, so much!
Dolores

A. Spruce
Re: Repairing several bathroom problems

You are welcome for the advice.

As for posting images, the easiest and best way to do that is to host them ****** somewhere, such as Tumbler, imagehost, etc., then you simply place a link here to them or insert them into your post.

As to your bathroom issues, I would recommend having at least three general contractors come out and take a look to assess the damage and provide bids for repairs. Choose the contractor based on how you feel about them being in your home unattended and the thoroughness of both their site visit and their bid. Choosing a bid based on price alone is an extremely bad way to go about it, price alone does not guarantee the quality of craftsmanship (good or bad).

Good luck and keep us apprised of your progress.

Mastercarpentry
Re: Repairing several bathroom problems

The key words here are "Rental" and "Condo".

If it's a rental, you need to focus on two things: Durability and how well it deals with a lack of proper care. This goes for everything rental, not just bathrooms. "Condo" implies the possibility of your problems spilling over to another property.

It does seem like you have some water damage already. At the minimum you need to physically get to that for inspection either from above or below, then do whatever is necessary to fix things properly. Although it is contrary to code, I like to use treated lumber on any bathroom floor rework so there is no chance of rot in the future. This will not pass inspection but if you DIY you can get the floor sheeting in before saying anything and claim you just replaced the sheeting with something better. And don't just nail- use exterior screws rated for ACQ lumber (like "Primer-guard"). They will hold even after an excess moisture event making future problems smaller.

Based on the situation you can either make an elegant bathroom which will help 'sell' the place or make it acceptable but bullet-proof. Your market will determine that. If you do tile, go to the John Bridge forum- it's the best. Select your styles and colors with an eye on universal long-term appeal. Today's most "trendy" equals the fastest "out-of-date" look tomorrow which will negate the gains you made in upgrading. Go for the broadest appeal even if you don't like it as well. Add some special details (accent lines and borders etc) to avoid blandness. The bathroom is the second most important 'selling point' of a home and it can make or break a deal.

If you go cheap, don't buy the cheapest tubs or enclosures- upgrade to the most durable (thickest) one you can afford. The thin stuff will not last. And don't go cheap on the installation- follow everything the manufacturer recommends to the letter or do something better. Spend your money on a great faucet or shower valve that will last; the low-cost ones are junk. Remember this is an investment for you so going back for repairs because you went cheap today is going to cost you a whole lot more tomorrow. That's never worth the initial savings. And keep maintenance in mind- you may need to replace an abused or damaged shower valve so be sure that can be done without destroying the tile-work you're spending so much on. Buy a few extra tiles of anything you're using so that you don't end up with the dreaded "Discontinued DaVinci Tile Disease" should future damage occur.

Owner-occupied is a different world where you're going to care, but you never know what a tennant is going to be like till it's done, so you have to allow for that. Downtime between tennants due to repairs eats your money faster than anything- one month's rent lost will buy you the upgraded items that will prevent that from happening. Your money is important- make it work for you long-term and you'll only have one short-term cost. Approach it any other way and you're going to have to keep spending forever. Money-pit or money-maker; the choice is yours.

Phil

joechoniski
Re: Repairing several bathroom problems

Bathrooms are made small spaces that are called upon to do many things. We can make the most of every part of your bathroom with ideas from our favorite ... see more Blocked Toilet London.

dj1
Re: Repairing several bathroom problems

Phil, very well said...and to the point.

dpal
Re: Repairing several bathroom problems

Oh you folks are wonderful!!! :):):) I feel a little more confident now about speaking to (at least 3) contractors and I also joined John Bridge Tile forum as suggested. I'll keep you posted...and probably ask more questions as I go along.

joechoniski
Re: Repairing several bathroom problems

Crack a window or the bathroom door while you shower or bathe to allow the steam to escape. If privacy is an issue, or it's too cold for an open window, wait until you are finished before opening the door or window. Keep the door and window open until the steam dissipates. Trim the bottom of the bathroom door to create a bigger gap for steam to escape if keeping the bathroom door open is not an option

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