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William
Removing Old Cast Iron Section

I could use some good recommendations on the easiest way to remove a section of old cast iron pipe. It is the 45 degree section circled in the picture below. The pipe looks to be either 1 1/2" or 2". It goes into a 4" section with appears to be soldiered with lead so I didn't want to disturb that piece. If I can remove the 45 degree elbow I should be good to go.

Should I heat the pipe up with a torch and try to unscrew it, or just cut the entire piece off with a reciprocating saw? I was told that these blades (http://www.amazon.com/LENOX-9114G-Titanium-Cutting-Reciprocating/dp/B0009MZJ4Q/ref=sr_1_2?s=hi&ie=UTF8&qid=1364489343&sr=1-2&keywords=LENOX+****+14TPI+Titanium+Edge+LAZER#brandRatings) cut through case iron rather easily so that wouldn't be an issue. Once I start working on this I am committed to finish it because the pipe goes to my sump pump which I am replacing, so the least amount of time taking this apart the better. Which would be the best way to remove this 45 degree elbow? Thanks.

MLB Construction
Re: Removing Old Cast Iron Section

the easiest way by far is to use a grinder with a metal disc. it will take less than 30 seconds to make the cut. i do it all the time. normally these fittings are taken apart with a 2-3 pound sledge but you don't want to damage the other pipes. if you don't have a grinder then the sawzall will be just fine.

dj1
Re: Removing Old Cast Iron Section

I prefer a side angle grinder too because it will give you the best cut. Wear eye protection.

If you run a new pipe instead use no hub connectors. Make sure you have all your parts available.

William
Re: Removing Old Cast Iron Section

That's funny because I was just looking at grinders.

Would a 4" grinder be too small?

William
Re: Removing Old Cast Iron Section
dj1 wrote:

If you run a new pipe instead use no hub connectors.

If I am able to unscrew the old cast iron elbow, and I can find a PVC fitting to screw on there, wouldn't that be better?

Or is it bad to connect PVC directly to cast iron?

MLB Construction
Re: Removing Old Cast Iron Section

you can get a pvc fitting to screw onto there but the odds of unscrewing it are down pretty close to zero. a 4" angle grinder will be fine.

William
Re: Removing Old Cast Iron Section
MLB Construction wrote:

you can get a pvc fitting to screw onto there but the odds of unscrewing it are down pretty close to zero.

What if I heated it up with a torch? Wouldn't that expand the pipe and allow it to come off?

dj1
Re: Removing Old Cast Iron Section

I wouldn't try torching it or unscrewing it, due to the fact that you're dealing with an old pipe. You never know what can happen if you try - you may cause irreversible damage to the pipe and say: I should have listened to MLB and dj.

By heating, it might fall apart. By rotating, it might create a lot of damage to the rest of the pipe.

Cutting is the easiest answer, and that was your initial question.

von_steuben
Re: Removing Old Cast Iron Section

I've had good luck using a circular saw with a 7 1/2" metal cutting blade, HD, Lowe's, to easily cut thru leaking or cracked cast iron sections as pictured here; wear eye protection & expect a shower of sparks; for the new connectors, try an easy to use neoprene flex FERNCO connector, such as what is pictured below; when at the second site below, click onto "images for fernco fitting images" for extensive photos of many different fernco fittings.

http://www.grainger.com/Grainger/FERNCO-Flexible-Coupling-4P011
http://www.google.com/search?q=fernco+fitting+images&hl=en&nsj=1&tmb=isch&tbo=u&source=univ&sa=X&ei=oElWUZGrN9LK4AODyIHwDA&ued=OCDAQsAQ&biw=1024

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