Home>Discussions>KITCHENS>Remodeling questions and advice
3 posts / 0 new
Last post
stuntmusic
Remodeling questions and advice
stuntmusic

I am having to redo my kitchen, ahead of some new counter-tops.

The cabinets are going to stay.

A previous rehab put 2" tile on the walls, which are being removed. the tile being removed is both on interior walls as well as exterior walls.

We have a mixture of intact wall, intact wall with mastic, intact wall with some divots or even holes where the wallboard was destroyed in trying to remove the tile.

Question 1: Should I remove all the wallboard I can and not try to patch the existing damaged wallboard?

Question 2: Should there be a difference in the interior wallboard and the exterior wallboard? I notice on the exterior facing side, there seems to be a clear film over the insulation, which leads me to ask if that wallboard needs to be thicker or treated differently.

My hunch is to just rip it all down, as best I can and start with a clean flat surface.

Taking the cabinets out, either the ones on the floor or mounted on the walls would not be an option right now. I can move the current counter-tops so I can feather to those edges, where i can get to them.

Any advice?

A. Spruce
Re: Remodeling questions and advice
A. Spruce

What you do with the wall damage will depend on what you plan on doing with your back splashes. If you are retiling there is no need to repair anything that won't be visible, as long as it is structurally sound. If the walls will be visible, then you need to repair them. I would opt for repair rather than drywall replacement, unless you've destroyed the structural integrity of the drywall.

Repairs sound like mostly minor floating to smooth out nicks and dings. Larger divots can be filled with quick set drywall compound to fill most of the crater, then tape it and float it smooth. This will fill and hold the patch in place. Holes up to an inch or so in diameter can be patched the same way. Larger holes need to be cut out and patched OR get patch screen, either will do fine. When the patching is done and the area is floated smooth, you can then texture to match the surrounding areas. Always prime fresh drywall, two coats, followed by two coats of your paint of choice.

The plastic sheathing behind the drywall is a vapor barrier. You should try to maintain this as best you can, however a couple holes here and there in the kitchen isn't going to reduce it effectiveness enough to notice.

dj1
Re: Remodeling questions and advice
dj1

Quote:

"Question 1: Should I remove all the wallboard I can and not try to patch the existing damaged wallboard?

Question 2: Should there be a difference in the interior wallboard and the exterior wallboard? I notice on the exterior facing side, there seems to be a clear film over the insulation, which leads me to ask if that wallboard needs to be thicker or treated differently."

1. Remove all drywall only if the existing board is beyond repair, or if you feel that the repair will cost more than replacing it. Again, you should only worry about drywall which will be exposed.

2. Standard drywall for interior walls and exterior walls is the same. Standard width is 1/2". Optional width is 5/8". Your call.

Sponsored Stories

TV Listings

Find TV listings for This Old House and Ask This Old House in your area.