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OldHouseWife
Reliability of lead testing kit

After pulling off all of the 1970's panelling throughout our 1916 farmhouse, we've had to patch the multitudes of nail holes in the plaster walls which will require floor to ceiling sanding. As I was concerned that the original paint under the panelling contained lead, I purchased a lead testing kit at the local hardware store. I've tested four different rooms, and all of the tests were negative for lead. However, I've since been reading that any house built prior to 1950 will always contain high levels of lead in the paint, so I'm wondering if these tests are reliable and am I okay believing we're lead free?

havanagranite
Re: Reliability of lead testing kit
OldHouseWife wrote:

After pulling off all of the 1970's panelling throughout our 1916 farmhouse, we've had to patch the multitudes of nail holes in the plaster walls which will require floor to ceiling sanding. As I was concerned that the original paint under the panelling contained lead, I purchased a lead testing kit at the local hardware store. I've tested four different rooms, and all of the tests were negative for lead. However, I've since been reading that any house built prior to 1950 will always contain high levels of lead in the paint, so I'm wondering if these tests are reliable and am I okay believing we're lead free?

check out this government link to see their results on these tests

http://www.cpsc.gov/cpscpub/prerel/prhtml08/lead.pdf

http://www.epa.gov/lead/pubs/leadinfo.htm#hazard

J Roper
Re: Reliability of lead testing kit

In 1972 the EPA gave paint makers 4 years to remove the lead from paints. Houses painted after 1976 could have lead paint.
(about 50% )
A more friendly way of taking care of lead rather than remove it is to encapsulate it. Look online for lead encapsulation products for inerior. One of the most important things is the bonding capability of the product. Some have an adhesive primer coat that ensures it stays put. The thickness of the finish coat is what actually encaplulates it. Lately the EPA looks at that as beng better than removal because it does not put the lead dust into the air.
The down side, on ornate trim, is that the thickness can fill in ornamental detail. On walls it would be a good way to go.
Look at Rhino Shield. They make an encapsulating primer and the thickness qualifies it for encapsulation.

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