Home>Discussions>KITCHENS>Refinishing Kitchen Cabinets
15 posts / 0 new
Last post
Curly Q Link
Refinishing Kitchen Cabinets
Curly Q Link

I don't have enough cash to remodel my kitchen and my cabinets are kinda beat. Has any one used a product like Rustoleum Cabinet Transformations? The video makes it look easy. Is it easy? Any one have any expeirnce with this type of product?

A. Spruce
Re: Refinishing Kitchen Cabinets
A. Spruce

Do you want to paint your cabinets or refinish them? Answers will vary depending on what your goal is.

dj1
Re: Refinishing Kitchen Cabinets
dj1

Quote: " The video makes it look easy. Is it easy?"

Many times it does look easy in the video. Then when you try it...it's not.

Everything is easy to do, WHEN YOU KNOW HOW.

hollasboy
Re: Refinishing Kitchen Cabinets
hollasboy

I've painted cabinets before to freshen them up. Usually takes less than 1 gallon of paint to do cabinet fronts in a whole kitchen. If the cabinets are in decent shape, they will end up looking brand new. If they are not in decent shape, spend some time sprucing them up before painting. You can also then reuse the cabinet hardware, or replace that for an even newer look, but that hardware gets expensive real quick once you start multiplying by all the knobs and pulls.

Also, I'm talking about normal paint, I'm not a big believer in all these new fancy paint products that are triple the price of paint but are really just glorified paint. Paint is paint - easy to apply, easy to repair if it gets messed up later - and economical.

dj1
Re: Refinishing Kitchen Cabinets
dj1

I've had good success painting cabinets with a high gloss paint (about $25 a gal).

Prep work is needed, to bring the doors to an acceptable condition. Cleaning, degreasing and priming will be needed too.

As for the actual painting: you can brush high gloss paint on or spray it on. In most kitchens, brushing is a better choice, so you don't have to deal with over spray issues or ventilation issues.

A. Spruce
Re: Refinishing Kitchen Cabinets
A. Spruce
dj1 wrote:

I've had good success painting cabinets with a high gloss paint (about $25 a gal).

Prep work is needed, to bring the doors to an acceptable condition. Cleaning, degreasing and priming will be needed too.

As for the actual painting: you can brush high gloss paint on or spray it on. In most kitchens, brushing is a better choice, so you don't have to deal with over spray issues or ventilation issues.

Don't know where you're buying paint, but I've not seen $25 a gallon in nearly 20 years! Seems that +/- $40 a gallon is the going rate. Heck, it's $17 a quart, even at evil orange!

Everything else I agree with, but then you'd know that, wouldn't ya. :cool:

dj1
Re: Refinishing Kitchen Cabinets
dj1
A. Spruce wrote:

Don't know where you're buying paint, but I've not seen $25 a gallon in nearly 20 years! Seems that +/- $40 a gallon is the going rate. Heck, it's $17 a quart, even at evil orange!

Everything else I agree with, but then you'd know that, wouldn't ya. :cool:

We have outlets for landlords around here, these are businesses geared for the contractors and landlords. You won't find Benji Moore or Eddi Dunn on the label, but the paints do their job. Years ago we had Standard Brands Paint stores (cheap, cheap, cheap and excellent paints, did I mentioned cheap?) - but they folded. If you go to Lowe's you can still find high gloss Valspar for less than $30 a gal.

dj1
Re: Refinishing Kitchen Cabinets
dj1

BTW, here we pay 9.5% sales tax on things like paint.

But it wasn't enough for Sacramento.

So, for every gallon of paint there is an additional charge of 75 cents, and $3.75 for a 5 gal bucket. I forgot what they call it, but they have a name for it.

A. Spruce
Re: Refinishing Kitchen Cabinets
A. Spruce
dj1 wrote:

but they folded. If you go to Lowe's you can still find high gloss Valspar for less than $30 a gal.

No such outlets in these parts, however, I have been going to Lowe's the past 4 months and was very surprised to see Sherwin Williams on their shelves, and it was the cheaper of their paint offering for what I needed. I have used the heck out of Valspar over the years and love it, both as an inexpensive paint and for it's user friendly and final finish qualities. Ace Hardware now carries Valspar, as does/did Orchard Supply Hardware/Sears. Notice I used the term "inexpensive" as opposed to "cheap", there is a difference. Valspar is a low cost, good quality paint, as opposed to a discount paint that does not hold up to the premise of the product, let alone the hype of the store/manufacturer.

dj1 wrote:

BTW, here we pay 9.5% sales tax on things like paint.

But it wasn't enough for Sacramento.

So, for every gallon of paint there is an additional charge of 75 cents, and $3.75 for a 5 gal bucket. I forgot what they call it, but they have a name for it.

We're at 8.5% in these parts, not sure if we've got a surcharge or not. I can tell you that we've got a surcharge on lumber, regardless of what the establishment calls it, it's just another revenue enhancement scheme that does nothing to save resources or to promote good stewardship or quality construction practices.

dj1
Re: Refinishing Kitchen Cabinets
dj1

So back to the sales tax and recycle fee on paints sold in Southern California:

Let's say I buy a gallon of flat paint for $10. I know, in many parts of the country you can't get that for this price, but here you still can.

Sales tax will be 95 cents
Recycle fee (looks, smells and acts as a tax) will be 75 cents.
Total taxes will be $1.70 which is exactly a whopping 17% of the purchase price.

The state could have never been able to raise sales tax to that level, so it found a way to bypass the voters by enacting "fees".

Furthermore, there are various fees on other products too, like lumber fee on lumber and many many others.

That's life.

Mastercarpentry
Re: Refinishing Kitchen Cabinets
Mastercarpentry

Back to the OP's issue, I've been painting cabinets with Behr oil-based semi-gloss enamel for quite some years now. Gives a hard, durable, washable, grease-spatter-resistant finish that is far superior to any water-based product I've found for this application. Prepwork is critical, and a very nice finish can be achieved by using 6" wide foam trim peanut rollers on the flat surfaces. The resulting finish will look like it was sprayed with a little 'orange peel', not glass smooth but superior to all but the very best brushwork or spraying. The roller will need a bit of use before it wants to hold this paint properly, around 3 minutes of actual rolling, but after that it works well. The paint won't hurt the foam but thinners will melt it so just toss it when you're done. Around $2 each, $1 for a disposable pan to hold the paint, and a few $ for the reusable handle.

Any good brand of oil-based enamel will do, Behr is just easily available, usually cheaper and works well right out of the can, though adding a little "Penetrol" never hurts and give it better workability, especially for the brushwork. Covers well too; one coat may be all you need but that will vary based on how you apply it and what colors are involved.

Phil

Pages

Sponsored Stories

TV Listings

Find TV listings for This Old House and Ask This Old House in your area.