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Todd82TA
Redundant GFCI Outlets?

Hey guys, I think I may have made a mistake, and I'm hoping you guys can correct me, or tell me if what I did was OK.

When I got my home inspected (an older home I bought recently), the inspector said that the outlets within 10 feet from a sink or on the countertop should be GFI.

So that's what I did.

 

What I didn't realize is that they all work off the same circuit basically. So, any outlets that are daisy-chained AFTER the outlet don't need to be GFI because they are already protected by the GFI outlet anyway.

 

So my question is, is it a problem that I replaced three outlets with GFCI outlets, even though they're all on the same circuit and daisy-chained from one to the next? Is this against code, or is it simply unnecessary? I'm ok with unnecessary, I just don't want to violate code.

 

Thanks!!!

HandyAndyInMtAiry
Re: Redundant GFCI Outlets?

Todd,

I have never used GFCI outlets. I only use AFCI/GFCI breakers. I decided to use that type of breaker for every circuit that I have in all 3 panels. The advantage of this way is that for one example, if you were to drive a nail thru the wire that is leading to the first device that has a GFCI outlet, the solid breaker may not trip. If you drive the nail into only one wire, the load, and it goes into wood, or concrete, something like that, there is a chance the circuit would stay live. With using breakers, the wire leaving the panel is also protected.

I would think from the design of the device, that the neutral would not have a path all the way back to the panel if one of the devices toward the end of the chain would trip.

Yes, it is unnecessary for sure. Trip one at the end of the chain and see if the first device in the chain also trips. That is what is supposed to happen, the entire circuit is supposed to be dead if any one device in the chain trips.

Andrew

Handy Andy In Mt Airy NC

Todd82TA
Re: Redundant GFCI Outlets?

Thanks Andy! I will check that this weekend and see what it does.

Just to confirm, so I understand what I'm doing here.

 

If I was to remove the redundant GCFI outlets, the one that I want to keep, would be the one that is CLOSEST up the circuit to the circuit breaker panel, correct?

 

The other day, we had a blow-up ghost plugged in, and the sprinkler went on and we forgot to unplug it the night before. The upstairs and downstairs bathroom outlets tripped, as well as the outside front outlet. It took me a good half an hour before I thought to just check the GCFI outlets, and I had no idea that the upstairs bathroom (which I have renovated) was even connected to the same circuit as the outside outlet, and the downstairs bathroom (which I have not yet renovated). So it might be doing what you say... but I'll check it out.

 

Thank you again!

HandyAndyInMtAiry
Re: Redundant GFCI Outlets?

Those rooms and anything outside are not supposed to be on the same circuit. Outside anything, has to be on its own circuit. What I mean by that is, anything that is different, needs to be on its own circuit. Outlets outside on their own, lights outside on their own, and any other devices outside, on their own. I put all bathrooms on their own circuit, even splitting up the lights and outlets to be on their own circuit in each.

If the Ground Fault tripped, it was not due to overloading, there is something incorrect in the circuit some where. An overload would have tripped the breaker, just what was supposed to happen for an overload. Ground fault means that something was shorted to ground. I would say there was an outlet that is not water tight had water intrusion and caused the line and ground to come into contact with each other, so the Ground Fault tripped.

Yes, the device that is first inline is the one that should have the GFCI outlet. But I do not recommend outlets, I like the circuit breaker best.

Andrew

Handy Andy In Mt Airy NC

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