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Mastercarpentry
Re: Propane heaters?

Used correctly, portable propane heaters can be safe, but are not intended to be used as a primary heat source in a home and are not to be used without a wide-awake person monitoring them. If your insurance company finds that you have one of these in your home you'll probably hear about your policy being cancelled because they know that firefighters aren't going to enter a structure where they know propane tanks like these are located inside. The OP mentioned models made overseas; if it does not have a "UL Approved" rating and label, it cannot be legally used in the US anywhere for any purpose.

If you want additional room heat, check out portable electric heat, the ceramic models are small, fairly efficient, and clean. You can opt for a "Faux Fireplace" model like I have of you want something fancier. Most of these cost less than $2.00 a day in continuous use on high and can heat an average sized room all by themselves pretty well.

For the scroungers like myself: Never try to use one of the old-style freestanding unvented gas heaters indoors. They have no safety features and have killed many through the years. Remove the shutoff valves so they can't be used, and view them as relics of a past age.

Phil

JLMCDANIEL
Re: Propane heaters?

I have had ventless gas logs (propane) for about 25 years with no problem. Oxy. Dep. works well but I would suggest a CO monitor anyway. It has been a life saver during power outages.

jack

Fencepost
Re: Propane heaters?

One thing I'll say for electric heaters: they are all 100% efficient; there are none any more or less efficient than another. You will always get as much energy as heat output as there is in electric input. A 1500W fan forced heater will put out 1500W of heat. So will a 1500W ceramic heater or a 1500W radiant heater.

Where you *may* notice an efficiency is with radiant heat -- but that efficiency is conditional on not trying to heat the room. Rather than heating the air then heating you, it heats you directly. So you will feel warm right away whereas with convection/fan-forced, it takes a while before you feel warm. During the first little while, radiant may be more efficient in that you feel warm before the room is really warm. So if you aren't trying to maintain a warm room, 750W of radiant heat may be as effective as 1500W of fan-forced (and from that perspective more efficient). On the other hand, if you ARE trying to maintain a certain air temperature, neither will be more efficient. Bottom line is to go with whatever makes you the most comfortable.

(Sidebar: if you are heating your home with electric resistance heat -- not a heat pump -- CFL light bulbs save no energy versus using incandescent bulbs during the heating season. All the energy used by either goes to heat the home; since CFL uses less energy it produces less heat which must be made up by the heating system.)

A heat pump is considered to be more than 100% efficient, because the energy output into your home (in the winter when heating) or out of your home (in the summer when cooling) is greater than the energy required to operate. Of course, it's awfully hard to cozy up to a heat pump on a frosty morning.

(Sidebar #2: All electric devices in your home contribute all of the energy they use toward heating your home, except for any light, sound, or other radiant energy that escapes to the exterior. All forms of energy decay toward the infrared spectrum, what we perceive as heat. The light produced by a light bulb? As the light is absorbed by objects, the light energy decays to infrared and the objects are heated. Your stereo system? As the sound is absorbed by objects, the acoustic energy decays to infrared and the objects are heated. The remote control for your RC drone? Some of the radio waves sent out by the transmitter are absorbed by objects... I think you get the point.)

Mastercarpentry
Re: Propane heaters?
JLMCDANIEL wrote:

I have had ventless gas logs (propane) for about 25 years with no problem. Oxy. Dep. works well but I would suggest a CO monitor anyway. It has been a life saver during power outages.

jack

Jack, there's two huge differences here- one is the permanent install which should mitigate portable-specific fire hazards, and the other is that with these the tank is outside (and usually required to be a set distance away from the house to protect it from a house fire). And vented or not, if there's combustion involved anywhere, then a CO monitor/alarm is a good idea in that home. Gas logs are becoming hugely popular for very good reasons and I wish I had a fireplace (or even the room for one) here so I could put a set in for my own use :cool:

Fencepost, I like the point you make about incandescent vs CFL lighting. Power efficiency per lumen isn't everything! I can't say about 'everything decaying toward infrared' though. Even when I'm energetic (which is less and less often these days), my girlfriend does not believe that I'm any 'hotter' than before, so you might not be 100% correct on that one :eek:

Phil

JLMCDANIEL
Re: Propane heaters?

Phil, this is what we have

we installed ventless gas logs in ours and didn't need the flue.

Jack

Mastercarpentry
Re: Propane heaters?

That's a nice there, Jack! If you get tired of it, I'll be happy to pay the shipping to here ;)

Phil

nobbobby
Re: Propane heaters?

My family used this heater about 6 years, it's have some problem, not good to our health.
~~NOBBY~~

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