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TomC1950
Privacy fence
TomC1950

I'm installing a privacy fence around the perimeter of my yard. Most of it is level. There is one area where the landscape slopes up about 4-feet. How do I make the transition from the two different elevations to make the fence look professional. The fence will be 6-foot high around the entire property. Any ideas?

dj1
Re: Privacy fence
dj1

Tell us more, like what style/type of fence you plan to install and is the slop kind of gradual or sudden.

TomC1950
Re: Privacy fence
TomC1950

The sections are 6-foot dog-eared style with no spacing between boards. The slope of approximately 4-feet covers about 16-feet so it would consist of two sections needed to cover the 4-foot slope.

A. Spruce
Re: Privacy fence
A. Spruce

1 - Fences generally follow the topography of the land, so the slope will be reflected by the fence. Fence boards are installed vertically plumb.

2 -Your framing will run perpendicular to the string at the set spacing equal to the rest of the fencing.

3 -To get an even run, you install one board at the bottom of the slope and one at the top of the slope and then run a string line from the top of one board to the other. This sets your picket height. Now, the ground is rarely perfectly smooth or "level" between two points, particularly the further the two points are from each other. I personally like about 1" space between the fence picket and the ground, it aids in rot prevention and yard maintenance. Given the 1" space, your string should be 6'1" from the ground. You will want to check the string height at multiple points along the run to make sure that the gap at the ground is not too excessive, preferably it will be less because you can trim the pickets to account for changes in topography, without sacrificing the quality of the sight line which is the top of the fence, guided by the string. If the gap is too excessive, then lower the guide string so that you have the desired clearance at the lowest point in the topography, then simply trim the bottoms of the pickets as needed for the higher spots.

4 - For posts, I prefer a Postmaster type post, these are a formed steel post, usually a "U" or "Z" shape with perforations down each side for the attachment of framing. This type of post is far more attractive because you can completely hide it from view, as well as being cheaper than the more common cyclone fence post and accompanying bulky and unsightly hardware it takes to attach the framing. Either form of steel post will be a permanent post, as opposed to wood that is subject to a short life of only a few years before they rot off and have to be replaced. Trust me, putting in the post is hard enough the first time, you don't want to have to pull a concrete core to replace it in just a couple years.

5 - Fasteners - Kind of a personal choice thing here, you basically have the options of galvanized common nail, galvanized ring shank nail, or coated screw. Of these options, I'd go with either the ring shank nail or the screw, since you're not likely to have a nail gun, that would mean screws. The reason I'd recommend screws over common nails is that common nails loosen over time, screws won't. Nails can also be hard to remove without breaking the pickets should the need arise, say, if you've got to replace a post, whereas screws can be removed with relative ease 99% of the time.

dj1
Re: Privacy fence
dj1

Spruce's description is just about the way most fence builders do it.

If I could add one other thing: I like to install 3 horizontal members between posts, to which you screw the dog ear boards: one at the bottom, one at the top and one in the middle. This will prevent the boards from bowing. Use at least 6 screws for each board.

TomC1950
Re: Privacy fence
TomC1950

Thanks for all of your input. It should turn out great!

Re: Privacy fence

yes it is the good safety idea for outdoor area.

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