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wamusician
Prefinished hardwood, grooves, and dirt

We are planning a kitchen remodel. My husband is quite handy, and wants to do as much of the work himself as possible. That is the primary reason why he wants to do a prefinished wood floor - we both like the idea of having a wood floor, and it's something he knows he can install.

However, I've been told that the grooves created by this type of flooring can collect grime and be hard to clean. In addition, we recently had our older fridge leak all over the floor (it's been replaced), which is why we decided to remodel now vs. later.

I've seen mention of "Junckers" flooring and am under the impression that it creates a grooveless floor when put together. Can anyone tell me if that is true, and if there are other prefinished choices that create a grooveless surface?

(and I have to say that as a musician, I never thought I'd be asking for something that is grooveless!! :) )

jkirk
Re: Prefinished hardwood, grooves, and dirt

the only hardwood flooring that im aware of that doesnt have the edge chamfer is unfinished hardwood. your best bet is to check with the local flooring suppliers in your area to see if you can get square edge prefinished flooring. i would avoid big box stores however, they dont have teh best quality and the markup can be a killer

A. Spruce
Re: Prefinished hardwood, grooves, and dirt
jkirk wrote:

the only hardwood flooring that im aware of that doesnt have the edge chamfer is unfinished hardwood. your best bet is to check with the local flooring suppliers in your area to see if you can get square edge prefinished flooring. i would avoid big box stores however, they dont have teh best quality and the markup can be a killer

Square edge should actually be pretty easy to find. As jkirk suggests, go to some flooring retailers to see what is available in your area. I used Kahrs when I did my house because it had the thickest wood surface of any of the engineered flooring. It came in both pre-finished and unfinished, there are advantages to both, and it had the square edge you're looking for. I'll warn ya though, it wasn't cheap.

wamusician
Re: Prefinished hardwood, grooves, and dirt

Well I looked at some Kahrs square edge and was amazed at how tightly the boards lock together. But, the finish on it made it look more "fake" to me than the laminate samples in the same store! They had some acacia solid prefinished for less than $5/sf, which seemed like a pretty good price, and the guy said it would take more of a beating.

So I don't know. I still really want stone-looking tile, but my husband thinks it will be too heavy (500sf), and I wonder if it will be too cold & hard, and we'd have to reseal it periodically, I'm told. Decisions, decisions!!

A. Spruce
Re: Prefinished hardwood, grooves, and dirt
wamusician wrote:

Well I looked at some Kahrs square edge and was amazed at how tightly the boards lock together. But, the finish on it made it look more "fake" to me than the laminate samples in the same store! They had some acacia solid prefinished for less than $5/sf, which seemed like a pretty good price, and the guy said it would take more of a beating.

You should be able to get it in an unfinished plank, allowing you to install it, lightly screen it to smooth out any imperfections, and then apply a finish. This will allow you to control the color and sheen of the finish, rather than leaving it up to the manufacturer. One word of caution with this route, the factory finish will be more durable than anything that you can apply after the install. That is not to say that post install finishes are bad, only that the controlled environment of the factory insures a very tough and durable surface.

I personally am not a fan of tile floors, they are extremely hard which in turn makes them very stressful on your feet, legs, and back if you spend any amount of time standing on it, say while working in the kitchen preparing meals. My last home was vinyl over concrete slab and it was murder to stand on for any length of time. After installing the Kahrs, it was amazing what a difference in the fatigue level there was. The wood was so much better and far more beautiful than nasty old vinyl. An added benefit of wood is that if you drop something on the floor, it's less likely to break than dropping something on tile.

Good luck with your decision, no matter what surface you choose. Let us know how it goes. :cool:

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