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JLMCDANIEL
Re: Power Strip installation?

One thing I forgot to mention was that power strips (actually called relocatable power taps) do not fall under the purview of the NEC to find out which ones are approved for the insulation in counter tops you would have to check Underwriters Laboratory White Book. Something else for you to read.:eek:

Jack

Re: Power Strip installation?

Jack I agree on the UL listed assemblies. But keep in mind a inspector does not inspect a UL listed assembly. But the he can turn down it being used. It must be listed for that USE. Key word is for that USE. And I am not sure if a power strip in a kitchen of all places would be approved unless it was 20 amp rated. Just my opinion. I hate power strips or extention cords as they to me are fires waiting to happen..:eek:

JLMCDANIEL
Re: Power Strip installation?

Raven,
There are a few power strips approved for in counter kitchen use at UL. I don't have their White Book so I can't list specifics. Yes it would have to be 20 amp rated but the discussion was about what size wires are needed in the strip to get that rating.
Jack

Re: Power Strip installation?

Co0l Jack You Da Man!!!!:)

Dave357
Re: Power Strip installation?

Wiremold's line of Plugmold is what's needed here. I used to install a lot of this in store fixtures (lamp displays, etc.) It comes in a couple of different plug spacings (6" & 12" o.c. are the ones I'm familiar with, though there may be others.) It is available in 12-ga 1-circuit or 2-circuit varieties. It's also a pain in the a$$ to work with. Definitely buy the Wiremold wire connectors. You'll never get 3-4 wire nuts connected and still get the cover snapped on.

JLMCDANIEL
Re: Power Strip installation?
Dave357 wrote:

Wiremold's line of Plugmold is what's needed here. I used to install a lot of this in store fixtures (lamp displays, etc.) It comes in a couple of different plug spacings (6" & 12" o.c. are the ones I'm familiar with, though there may be others.) It is available in 12-ga 1-circuit or 2-circuit varieties. It's also a pain in the a$$ to work with. Definitely buy the Wiremold wire connectors. You'll never get 3-4 wire nuts connected and still get the cover snapped on.

But is it UL approved for this application? :confused:
Jack

Dave357
Re: Power Strip installation?
JLMCDANIEL wrote:

But is it UL approved for this application? :confused:
Jack

Plugmold is wired with 12-ga wire, it is grounded, and it carries a UL label. I can't imagine why it wouldn't be approved for kitchen countertop outlets, but I'll leave it to someone else to go digging through the UL White Book.

Jack, do you actually look up every switch, outlet, device, motor, appliance, fixture, doo-dad, etc before you install them?

JLMCDANIEL
Re: Power Strip installation?
Dave357 wrote:

Plugmold is wired with 12-ga wire, it is grounded, and it carries a UL label. I can't imagine why it wouldn't be approved for kitchen countertop outlets, but I'll leave it to someone else to go digging through the UL White Book.

Jack, do you actually look up every switch, outlet, device, motor, appliance, fixture, doo-dad, etc before you install them?

No, most are used often enough to know they are approved, but when faced with a new application it is cheaper to check than it is to get Red Tagged and have to tear it out and replace. You have to deal with more than one standard, NEC, local code, UL certification, transmission standards, panel wiring and industrial standards. As one state inspector once told me "We don't give a damn what the national code is, this is what we require". Not knowing can cost a great deal of money. Power strips have been around for a long time but until recently were restricted by code to temporary use only.
Jack

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