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bhemati
Power Strip installation?

I would like to know how to replace the kitchen receptacles with Power Strip outlet that installs right under the kitchen cabinets.
I saw a show long time ago and suggested replacing kitchen outlets with power strip when you decide to install tile backsplash in order to hide them.
Appreciate any help out there.

Re: Power Strip installation?

a kitchen is required by code to have 2- 20 amp circuts. There also is requirement to have at least two of those circuits be available at the kitchen counters. those 20 amp circuts require 12 gage wire by code. This is because kitchen appliances require more than the typical 15 amp (14 gage wire) circuts found throughout the rest of your house. Most all power strips use 16 gage wire. Not really a safe thing to use in a kitchen area. Although there are commercial power strips that have the 12 wire required for 20 amps circuts. I would check with a electrical supply house which should be able to get them for you. I personaly have not seen them in the big box stores.

Ernie_Fergler
Re: Power Strip installation?

Wiremold, if anybody, might have something to fit your needs.
And I hate typing this, but most big boxes carry their product line. I just don't use a large amount of Wiremold items, but all are top notch.
Just follow Ravens53 advice for the number of circuits and wire size.

Re: Power Strip installation?

Ernie I was going to mention Wiremold as I think they make one. But being a competitor of mine I didn't want to advertise for them:D

Ernie_Fergler
Re: Power Strip installation?
Ravens53 wrote:

Ernie I was going to mention Wiremold as I think they make one. But being a competitor of mine I didn't want to advertise for them:D

Can't fight you there !!!!;)

JLMCDANIEL
Re: Power Strip installation?
Ravens53 wrote:

a kitchen is required by code to have 2- 20 amp circuts. There also is requirement to have at least two of those circuits be available at the kitchen counters. those 20 amp circuts require 12 gage wire by code. This is because kitchen appliances require more than the typical 15 amp (14 gage wire) circuts found throughout the rest of your house. Most all power strips use 16 gage wire. Not really a safe thing to use in a kitchen area. Although there are commercial power strips that have the 12 wire required for 20 amps circuts. I would check with a electrical supply house which should be able to get them for you. I personaly have not seen them in the big box stores.

I believe the wiring in the power strips falls under panel wiring rating and 16ga wire has an ampacity rating for 20 amps in panel wiring.
Jack

Re: Power Strip installation?
JLMCDANIEL wrote:

I believe the wiring in the power strips falls under panel wiring rating and 16ga wire has an ampacity rating for 20 amps in panel wiring.
Jack

If I am not mistaken he was talking about doing away with the old outlets. This becomes part of the building and permanently wired to the building. That requires 20 amp 12 gage wire.

I am not sure what you are talking about panel wiring. But I assume like control cabinets in motor control centers? It could be true I have never heard of that. AS I know I do not know everything. Jack teach me what you know I really would like to know:confused:

JLMCDANIEL
Re: Power Strip installation?

Nec requires 12 ga for 20 amp for what they classify as transmission and in house wiring. A good example of panel wiring in a home is to look at the requirement for wiring to an electric hot water heater , then look at the size of wiring already installed in the WH going to the elements and thermostat. Another example is the size of wires required to go th a ceiling light and the size of the wires used to wire the fixture it's self. Residential and commercial electricians are generally concern with the house wiring while equipment manufacturers are usually help to panel wiring standards. For instance your 12 ga wire that is rated at 20 amp is rated at 41 amps for panel wiring and 9.3 amps for transmission wiring. Generally housing and commercial wiring have about 200% safety built in.
Jack

Ernie_Fergler
Re: Power Strip installation?
JLMCDANIEL wrote:

Nec requires 12 ga for 20 amp for what they classify as transmission and in house wiring. A good example of panel wiring in a home is to look at the requirement for wiring to an electric hot water heater , then look at the size of wiring already installed in the WH going to the elements and thermostat. Another example is the size of wires required to go th a ceiling light and the size of the wires used to wire the fixture it's self. Residential and commercial electricians are generally concern with the house wiring while equipment manufacturers are usually help to panel wiring standards. For instance your 12 ga wire that is rated at 20 amp is rated at 41 amps for panel wiring and 9.3 amps for transmission wiring. Generally housing and commercial wiring have about 200% safety built in.
Jack

Would florescent light fixtures fall in to that category as well?

JLMCDANIEL
Re: Power Strip installation?
Ernie_Fergler wrote:

Would florescent light fixtures fall in to that category as well?

I believe all light fixture are rated at 15 amp or higher but none that I know of have 14 ga. or larger internal wiring. As I remember the smallest ga. internal wiring allowed is 18 ga. (ampacity of 16) for light fixtures but you must use a 14 ga. service or in wall. My guess is the required 15 amp rating goes back to when people replaced bulbs with screw in recepticales to plug in appliances like radios, but just a guess.
Jack

JLMCDANIEL
Re: Power Strip installation?

Those ampacity ratings are for copper wire. I have never worked with aluminum wire.
Jack

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