10 posts / 0 new
Last post
christysilvia34
Pipes

I bought a new washer. It is h.e. my problem is my pipe isn't draining the water down it is spraying the water all over the place. Old pipes. House built in 1960. I don't know if it is not draining because it is clogged or if the pipe is to small or not enough pressure to drain it. Please help. The old washer drained but we replaced because the drum rusted out.

dj1
Re: Pipes

It's possible that you have a clogged drain. Snake the line, see if it helps. If not, write back.

A. Spruce
Re: Pipes

The pipe should be 2", and the stand pipe should be equal to or slightly higher than the back of the washer.

Dj is right, you should snake the drain to make sure it's clear. New machines have a higher discharge rate, which can easily overwhelm a semi-blocked drain.

christysilvia34
Re: Pipes

I will have to call a Plumber in the morning. Thank you for the advice. One more question if I wanted to replace the pipes in my house do I have to go through my house or can it be done on the outside? I heard I don't have to tear up my whole house but I wasn't sure. Thanks for the advice. I only have the snake you use for the toilet don't know if that would work.

dj1
Re: Pipes

"One more question if I wanted to replace the pipes in my house do I have to go through my house or can it be done on the outside? "

Are you talking about waste lines? fresh water hot and cold lines?

christysilvia34
Re: Pipes

All the pipes apparently have not been replaced ever they are clay pipes apparently. We had a pipe burst when we first boughtthe house in the kitchen and there was only half the pipe and the guy said they are clay pipes and you will probably need to replace all of them. It was under our tile in the kitchen. We have a lot of problems with them. Bathrooms always back up. Kitchen sink always backs up. Lots of dirt when they snake the pipes. House built in 1960.

A. Spruce
Re: Pipes

If the pipes are original to the house, the the supply lines are probably steel, which is certainly nearly closed off with corrosion by now. Waste lines are probably collapsing and full of tree roots, especially if you're dealing with clay waste lines or orangeburg pipe.

If your home is on a raised foundation, then the bulk of the waste lines can be replaced without any damage to the home, you won't be so lucky with supply lines, as you really need to replace them from source to fixture if you expect to cure pressure issues or debris clogs in the fixtures. Damage into the house won't be all that bad if it's a single story.

If your home is on a slab and any or all of the pipes run in the slab, then you've got a major demolition and reconstruction on your hands.

christysilvia34
Re: Pipes

Thanks for the advice. House is on a slab. Guess I have major demo on my hands. That stinks. I bought what they call a money pit..

dj1
Re: Pipes
christysilvia34 wrote:

Thanks for the advice. House is on a slab. Guess I have major demo on my hands. That stinks. I bought what they call a money pit..

Money pit? Not necessarily.

Fresh water pipe replacement: you can choose PEX over Copper, for less money.

Waste lines: find a creative plumber who will design new routes for the drain lines with minimum slab cutting possible, with the shortest way to the outside, even if it means longer routes outside, to the main. Go with PVC or ABS pipes.

A. Spruce
Re: Pipes

If you have water supply in the slab, abandon it and move it overhead. It is more susceptible to freezing, so make sure that it's insulated well when running in exterior walls and near the roof lines.

Sewer lines, might be able to be sleeved inside the house/slab and changed out to new ABS or PVC once it exits the house. Consult with several local plumbers about what will be best for your situation.

Sponsored Stories

TV Listings

Find TV listings for This Old House and Ask This Old House in your area.